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        Veterinary Parasitology – recent developments in immunology, epidemiology and control
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        Veterinary Parasitology – recent developments in immunology, epidemiology and control
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Abstract

There have been important developments in the field of veterinary parasitology over the last few years. This symposium was called to collect individuals together, who have made significant contributions to their field of study, to present and summarize their work.

I would like to pause for a moment before introducing the Symposium in this preface to comment on the sad loss of Professor Peter Nansen, a particularly eminent Danish scientist who developed our field of study. I, like many others, remember him with affection. He was a very helpful colleague and outstanding leader of the Danish Centre for Experimental Parasitology, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C. We are all saddened by his death and will continue to carry our memories of him with us.