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Schistosoma mansoni: evidence that ‘non-permissiveness’ in 129/Ola mice involves worm relocation and attrition in the lungs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2009


A. A. F. Elsaghier
Affiliation:
National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London NW7 1A A, UK
P. M. Knopf
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island, USA
G. F. Mitchell
Affiliation:
Walter & Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Australia
D. J. Mclaren
Affiliation:
National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London NW7 1A A, UK

Summary

129/Ola mice resemble WEHI 129J mice in that around 70% of the individuals in any given population resist a primary infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Squashed-organ autoradiographic tracking of [Se]selenomethionine-labelled parasites has shown that the kinetics of worm migration in 129/Ola mice follows the expected pattern, and that all rodents harbour essentially similar numbers of worms on day 14 post-infection. Combined lung and liver worm recovery techniques have revealed, however, that segregation of mice into ‘permissive’ and ‘non-permissive’ individuals can first be detected on day 20. ‘Non-permissive’ mice are characterized by the absence of schistosome eggs at all times in the liver parenchyma and, in consequence, lack the attendant manifestations of pathology; they do, however, harbour a few stunted worms in the liver and significant numbers of adult schistosomes in the pulmonary vasculature. Histological analysis of sectioned lung tissue from such animals indicates that some lung-located schistosomes feed, pair and lay eggs. Nevertheless, eosinophil-enriched inflammatory reactions develop around such worms and the parasites themselves exhibit various manifestations of trauma, ranging from minor vacuolation to gut herniation and extrusion. The phenomenon of ‘non-permissiveness’ thus involves retardation of worm development in the liver and, in consequence, relocation of the parasites to the lungs, where they become subject to host effector responses.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1989

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