Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-dxfhg Total loading time: 0.357 Render date: 2021-02-28T02:13:19.011Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

East China Sea or South China Sea, they are all China's Seas: comparing nationalism among China's maritime irredentist claims

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2018

Jonathan Dixon
Affiliation:
C4ADS, 1100 H St. NW, STE 450, Washington, DC 20005, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Much has been made over the past few years of China'vs ambitions of regaining control of its irredentist claims in the East and South China Seas. While some of this speculation focuses on the massive amounts of money the People's Republic of China (PRC) has funneled into its naval modernization program, other analysts are more interested in the drivers behind the increasingly popular sentiment that the country must “reclaim” its lost territories. The Chinese Communist Party can ill afford to ignore the voice of an already disenchanted population if it hopes to stay in power, particularly in regard to matters of national pride. As a result, in dealing with China's irredentist claims, nationalism in particular can be a powerful ideological factor in shaping the nation's foreign policies. This is especially apparent in the case of irredentism, where nationalism can often override diplomatic and strategic imperatives. This paper addresses the question of how does the nationalist discourse vary between two territorial disputes, the East and South China Seas. It uses discourse analysis to examine developing trends among online social media and news sites. This in turn allows for the construction of a framework of how nationalism develops among both elite and grassroots audiences.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Association for the Study of Nationalities 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Footnotes

All data have been culled from open-source materials and can be easily accessed via institutional subscriptions to academic journals. This paper is only being submitted to the Nationalities Papers for consideration and has received no outside funding. This is the sole work of the author, Jonathan Dixon, and contains nothing illegal, libelous, or fraudulent.

References

Amer, Ramses. 2014. “China, Vietnam, and the South China Sea: Disputes and Dispute Management.” Ocean Development and International Law 45 (1): 1740.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chang, Maria Hsia. 1998. “Chinese Irredentist Nationalism: The Magician's Last Trick.” Comparative Strategy 17 (1): 83100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chang, Felix K. 2012. “China's Naval Rise and the South China Sea: An Operational Assessment.” Orbis 56 (1): 1938.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, Zhimin. 2005. “Nationalism, Internationalism, and Chinese Foreign Policy.” Journal of Contemporary China 14 (42): 3553.Google Scholar
Chen, Yinghong. 2011. “From Campus Racism to Cyber Racism: Discourse of Race and Chinese Nationalism.” The China Quarterly 207 (1): 561579.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chung, Chien-Peng. 1998. “The Diaoyu/Tiaoyutai/Senkaku Islands Dispute: Domestic Politics and the Limits of Diplomacy.” American Asian Review 16 (3): 135164.Google Scholar
Chung, Chien-Peng. 2007. “Resolving China's Island Disputes: A Two-Level Game Analysis.” Journal of Chinese Political Science 12 (1): 4970.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Denk, Erdem. 2005. “Interpreting a Geographical Expression in a Nineteenth Century Cession Treaty and the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands Dispute.” The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law 20 (1): 97116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Downs, Erica Stretcker, and Saunders, Philip C. 1998. “Legitimacy and the Limits of Nationalism: China and the Diaoyu Islands.” International Security 23 (3): 114146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fravel, M. Taylor. 2011. “China's Strategy in the South China Sea.” Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic Affairs 33 (3): 292319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hoffmann, Robert, and Larner, Jeremy. 2013. “The Demography of Chinese Nationalism: A Field-Experimental Approach.” China Quarterly 213 (1): 189204.Google Scholar
Hughes, Christopher. 2011. “Reclassifying Chinese Nationalism: The Geopolitik Turn.” The Journal of Contemporary China 20 (71): 601620.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jie, Ma, and Balfour, Frederik. 2012. “China Protests Erupt as Japanese Group Lands on Disputed Island.” Bloomberg BusinessWeek. August 20. Accessed March 10, 2014. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012–08–20/china-protests-erupt-as-japanese-group-lands-on-disputed-island.html Google Scholar
King, Gary, Pan, Jennfier, and Roberts, Margaret E. 2013. “How Censorship in China Allows Government Criticism but Silences Collective Expression.” American Political Science Review 107 (2): 326343.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kleinsteiber, Meghan. 2013. “Nationalism and Domestic Politics as Drivers of Maritime Conflict.” SAIS Review of International Affairs 33 (2): 1519.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, Mingsheng. 2009. “Chinese Nationalism in an Unequal Cyber War.” China Media Research 5 (4): 6379.Google Scholar
Li, Jinming. 2011. “South China Sea: Disputes and Great Powers.” Contemporary International Relations 21 (4): 6992.Google Scholar
Malek, Melda. 2013. “A Legal Assessment of China's Historic Claims in the South China Sea.” Australian Journal of Maritime and Ocean Affairs 5(1): 2836.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pan, Zhongqi. 2007. “Sino-Japanese Dispute of the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands: The Pending Controversy from the Chinese Perspective.” Journal of Chinese Political Science 12 (1): 7192.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reilly, James. 2012. Strong Society, Smart State: The Rise of Pubic Opinion in China's Japan Policy. Chichester: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Reilly, James. 2014. “A Wave to Worry About? Public Opinions, Foreign Policy, and China's Anti-Japan Protests.” Journal of Contemporary China 23 (86): 197215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shen, Simon. 2004. “Nationalism or Nationalist Foreign Policy? Contemporary Chinese Nationalism and its Role in Shaping Chinese Foreign Policy in Response to the Belgrade Embassy Bombing.” Politics 24 (2): 122130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tang, Wenfang, and Darr, Benjamin. 2012. “Chinese Nationalism and Its Political and Social Origins.” Journal of Contemporary China 21 (77): 811826.Google Scholar
Tok, Sow Keat. 2010. “Nationalism-On-Demand? When Chinese Sovereignty Goes Online.” In Online Chinese Nationalism and China's Bilateral Relations, edited by Shin, Simon and Breslin, Shaun, 1517. New York: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
U.S. Energy Information Administration. 2014. East China Sea Brief, February 10. http://www.eia.gov/countries/analysisbriefs/east_china_sea/east_china_sea.pdf Google Scholar
Wang, Chih-ming. 2009. “Tracking Baodiao: Diaspora, Sovereignty, and Chinese American Resistance.” Chinese America: History and Perspectives 23 (1): 130136.Google Scholar
Zhang, Yuntao, and Tomlinson, John. 2012. “Three Constituencies of Online Dissent in China.” Chinese Journalism of Communication 5 (1): 5560.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhao, Suisheng. 2007. “Foreign Policy Implications of Chinese Nationalism Revisited: The Strident Turn.” Journal of Contemporary China 22 (82): 535553.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 192 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 20th November 2018 - 28th February 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

East China Sea or South China Sea, they are all China's Seas: comparing nationalism among China's maritime irredentist claims
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

East China Sea or South China Sea, they are all China's Seas: comparing nationalism among China's maritime irredentist claims
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

East China Sea or South China Sea, they are all China's Seas: comparing nationalism among China's maritime irredentist claims
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *