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Internal Friction in Ion-Implanted Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Xiao Liu
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853–2501, pohl@msc.cornell.edu
R. O. Pohl
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853–2501, pohl@msc.cornell.edu
Richard S. Crandall
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, rsc@nrel.nrel.gov
K. M. Jones
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, rsc@nrel.nrel.gov
Corresponding
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Abstract

Using a double-paddle oscillator, we have studied the internal friction of thin Si layers which have been disordered by ion implantation. We have identified the temperature-independent internal friction common to all amorphous solids below 10K, and also a narrow relaxation peak at ∼ 48K. This peak has been shown to be caused by divacancies in the damaged crystalline region underneath the amorphous layer. Thermal, rapid thermal, and laser-flash annealing have been compared. The minimum disorder is left after rapid thermal annealing.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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