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Helium Induced Cavities in Silicon: Their Formation, Microstructure and Gettering Ability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

J. R. Kaschny
Affiliation:
Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, FWIM, PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
P. F. P. Fichtner
Affiliation:
Departamento de Metalurgia, UFRGS, POB15051, 91501–970 Porto Alegre, Brazil
A. Muecklich
Affiliation:
Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, FWIM, PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
U. Kreissig
Affiliation:
Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, FWIM, PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
R. A. Yankov
Affiliation:
Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, FWIM, PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
R. Koegler
Affiliation:
Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, FWIM, PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
A. B. Danilin
Affiliation:
Centre for Analysis of Substances, 1 Elektrodnaya, 111524 Moscow, Russia
W. Skorupa
Affiliation:
Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, FWIM, PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
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Abstract

The formation of cavity microstructures in silicon following helium implantation (10 or 40 keV; 1×1015, l×1016 and 5×1016 cm−2) and annealing (800 °C) is investigated by means of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Channeling (RBS/C), and Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD). The processes of cavity nucleation and growth are found to depend critically on the implanted He concentration. For a maximum peak He concentration of about 5×1020 cm−3 the resulting microstructure appears to contain large overpressurized bubbles whose formation cannot be accounted by the conventional gas-release model and bubble-coarsening mechanisms predicting empty cavities. The trapping of Fe and Cu at such cavity regions is studied by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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References

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