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Imaging Biologically Induced Mineralization in Fully Hydrated Flow Systems

  • Logan Schultz (a1), Betsey Pitts (a1), Andrew C. Mitchell (a1) (a2), Alfred B. Cunningham (a1) and Robin Gerlach (a1)...

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A number of proposed technologies involve the controlled implementation of biologically induced carbonate mineral precipitation in the geologic subsurface. Examples include the enhancement of soil stability, immobilization of groundwater contaminants such as strontium and uranium, and the enhancement of oil recovery and geologic carbon sequestration via controlled permeability reduction. The most significant challenge in these technologies remains to identify and better understand an industrially, environmentally, and economically viable carbonate precipitation route.

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References

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[1]Whiffin, V, van Paassen, L, and Harkes, M, Geomicrobiol J 24 (2007) 417–23.
[2]Mitchell, A and Ferris, G, Environ Sci Technol 40 (2006) 213–26.
[3]Ferris, G, Stehmeier, L, Kantzas, A, and Mourits, F, J Can Petrol Technol 13 (1996) 5767.
[4]Rasband, W, ImageJ, U.S. National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/. 1997–2009.
[5]Stumm, W and Morgan, J, Aquatic Chemistry, Wiley, New York, 1996, p. 1022.
[6]Pitts, B and Stewart, P, Microscopy Today 16(4) (2008) 1822.
[7]Mitchell, A, Dideriksen, K, Spangler, L, Cunningham, A, and Gerlach, R, Environ Sci Technol 44 (2010) 5270–76.
[8]Cunningham, A, Gerlach, R, Spangler, L, and Mitchell, A, Energy Procedia 1 (2009) 3245–52.

Imaging Biologically Induced Mineralization in Fully Hydrated Flow Systems

  • Logan Schultz (a1), Betsey Pitts (a1), Andrew C. Mitchell (a1) (a2), Alfred B. Cunningham (a1) and Robin Gerlach (a1)...

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