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Mineralization of Sialoliths Investigated by Ex Vivo and In Vivo X-ray Computed Tomography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2019

Pedro Nolasco
Affiliation:
CeFEMA, Instituto Superior Técnico, University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal IT, Department of Bioengineering, Instituto Superior Técnico, University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Paulo V. Coelho
Affiliation:
Service of Maxillofacial Surgery, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, R. José António Serrano 1150-199 Lisboa, Portugal NMS/FCM-UNL, Nova Medical School––Medical Sciences Faculty, Nova University of Lisbon, Campo Mártires da Pátria, 130, 1169-056 Lisboa, Portugal
Carla Coelho
Affiliation:
Service of Maxillofacial Surgery, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, R. José António Serrano 1150-199 Lisboa, Portugal
David F. Angelo
Affiliation:
NMS/FCM-UNL, Nova Medical School––Medical Sciences Faculty, Nova University of Lisbon, Campo Mártires da Pátria, 130, 1169-056 Lisboa, Portugal
J. R. Dias
Affiliation:
CDRsp, Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, Rua de Portugal, Zona Industrial, 2430-028, Marinha Grande, Portugal
Nuno M. Alves
Affiliation:
CDRsp, Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, Rua de Portugal, Zona Industrial, 2430-028, Marinha Grande, Portugal
António Maurício
Affiliation:
CERENA, Department of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Georessources, Instituto Superior Técnico, University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Manuel F.C. Pereira
Affiliation:
CERENA, Department of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Georessources, Instituto Superior Técnico, University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
António P. Alves de Matos
Affiliation:
CESAM/CiiEM, Instituto Egas Moniz, Monte da Caparica, 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal
Raul C. Martins
Affiliation:
IT, Department of Bioengineering, Instituto Superior Técnico, University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Patrícia A. Carvalho
Affiliation:
CeFEMA, Instituto Superior Técnico, University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Forskningsveien 1, 0373 Oslo, Norway
Corresponding

Abstract

The fraction of organic matter present affects the fragmentation behavior of sialoliths; thus, pretherapeutic information on the degree of mineralization is relevant for a correct selection of lithotripsy procedures. This work proposes a methodology for in vivo characterization of salivary calculi in the pretherapeutic context. Sialoliths were characterized in detail by X-ray computed microtomography (μCT) in combination with atomic emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Correlative analysis of the same specimens was performed by in vivo and ex vivo helical computed tomography (HCT) and ex vivo μCT. The mineral matter in the sialoliths consisted essentially of apatite (89 vol%) and whitlockite (11 vol%) with average density of 1.8 g/cm3. In hydrated conditions, the mineral mass prevailed with 53 ± 13 wt%, whereas the organic matter, with a density of 1.2 g/cm3, occupied 65 ± 10% of the sialoliths’ volume. A quantitative relation between sialoliths mineral density and X-ray attenuation is proposed for both HCT and μCT.

Type
Biological Science Applications
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2019 

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