Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal DNA data do not support the separation of the Antarctic lichens Umbilicaria kappenii and Umbilicaria antarctica as distinct species

  • Sieglinde OTT (a1), Marcus BRINKMANN (a1), Nora WIRTZ (a2) and H. Thorsten LUMBSCH (a3)

Abstract

The Antarctic endemics Umbilicaria kappenii and U. antarctica are morphologically close, but mainly distinguished by their reproductive strategies. Umbilicaria antarctica propagates by means of thalloconidia. Umbilicaria kappenii lacks thalloconidia, but exhibits a variety of asexual propagules: soredia, adventive lobes and thallyles. We have now employed molecular data from three gene regions to examine the phylogenetic relationships of these two morphotypes. The phylogeny of ten samples and four outgroup taxa (Umbilicaria decussata, U. krascheninnikovii, U. nylanderiana, U. umbilicarioides) was reconstructed using Bayesian and maximum parsimony analyses of a combined data set of nuclear ITS, nuclear LSU rDNA and mitochondrial LSU rDNA sequences. Forty two new partial sequences of 14 specimens were generated. Our results indicate that all samples morphologically referred to U. antarctica and U. kappenii form a monophyletic group. A topology separating the two morphotypes as phylogenetic species is significantly rejected with the data set. It is proposed to place U. kappenii into synonymy with U. antarctica.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Corresponding author

Keywords

Mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal DNA data do not support the separation of the Antarctic lichens Umbilicaria kappenii and Umbilicaria antarctica as distinct species

  • Sieglinde OTT (a1), Marcus BRINKMANN (a1), Nora WIRTZ (a2) and H. Thorsten LUMBSCH (a3)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed