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Two new species of Acarosporaceae from North America with carbonized epihymenial accretions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 September 2016

Kerry KNUDSEN*
Affiliation:
Department of Ecology, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences, Prague, Kamýcká 129, Praha 6 - Suchdol, CZ–165 21, Czech Republic
Jana KOCOURKOVÁ
Affiliation:
Department of Ecology, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences, Prague, Kamýcká 129, Praha 6 - Suchdol, CZ–165 21, Czech Republic
Martin WESTBERG
Affiliation:
Department of Botany, Swedish Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden
Tim WHEELER
Affiliation:
Organismal Biology, Evolution, and Ecology Program, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana 59801, USA
*

Abstract

Acarospora brodoana K. Knudsen, Kocourk. & M. Westb. is described from the San Bernardino Mountains in southern California. A black hypothecium distinguishes it from other species with a carbonized epihymenium. Sarcogyne albothallina K. Knudsen, Wheeler & M. Westb. is described from the Missouri Breaks in Montana. A white non-farinose thallus and production of 4-O-methylhiascic acid distinguishes it from other species with a carbonized epihymenium. Both species would previously have been placed in Polysporina. The current reported diversity of Acarosporaceae in North America north of Mexico is 93 species.

Type
Articles
Copyright
© British Lichen Society, 2016 

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