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Warriors, Nobles, Commoners and Beasts: Figurines from Elite Buildings at Aguateca, Guatemala

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Daniela Triadan*
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (dtriadan@email.arizona.edu)

Abstract

Figurines and figurine fragments excavated at Aguateca, Petén, Guatemala, have unprecedented contextual information. Because the site's epicenter was rapidly abandoned, we have recovered whole and reconstructible figurines from floor contexts in elite residences. In contrast to most Maya sites, these figurines are part of assemblages that were in use or storage when the structures were abandoned, providing a unique opportunity to investigate their function and use. In addition, numerous figurine fragments were recovered from middens associated with these structures. In conjunction with the figurines found on floors, these fragments point to a domestic use of the figurines. The distributions of the in situ figurines in the elite residences suggest that they were used and possibly made by the women of these households. The study of this data set contributes to our understanding of Late Classic elite household activities and social and gender roles. A preponderance of male figurines, many of them warriors, may be related to this center's frequent engagements in warfare.

Resumen

Resumen

Las figurillas y fragmentos de figurillas excavadas en Aguateca, departamento de Petén, Guatemala, tienen información contextual sin precedente. El epicentro de Aguateca fue repentinamente abandonado lo que permitió recuperar figurillas enteras y reconstruibles en contextos de pisos de residencias de elites. En contraste con la mayoría de los sitios mayas, estas figurillas eran parte de conjuntos que fueron usados o almacenados durante el abandono de las estructuras y proveen una oportunidad excelente para investigar la función y el uso de estos artefactos. También recogimos una gran cantidad de fragmentos de figurillas de basureros, asociados con estas estructuras. Junto con las figurillas encontradas en los pisos, estos fragmentos indican su uso doméstico. Las distribuciones de las figurillas encontradas in situ en las residencias elitistas sugieren que fueron posiblemente usadas y tal vez producidas por las mujeres de estos grupos domésticos. El análisis de estos datos contribuye a nuestro conocimiento de actividades domésticas elitistas y roles sociales y del género en el período Clásico Tardío. Además, la preponderancia de figurillas masculinas, especialmente guerreros, está posiblemente relacionada a episodios frecuentes de guerra en este centro.

Type
Reports
Copyright
Copyright © Society for American Archaeology 2007

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