Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-9pqtr Total loading time: 0.608 Render date: 2021-04-19T01:18:05.385Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Nonconceptualist Readings of Kant and the Transcendental Deduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 January 2015

Thomas Land
Affiliation:
Corpus Christi College, Cambridge
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

I give an argument against nonconceptualist readings of Kant’s First Critique, according to which one can enjoy a Kantian intuition without possessing any concepts, and present an alternative reading. The argument is that nonconceptualist readings are forced to construe the Transcendental Deduction in one of three ways, none of which is acceptable: The Deduction is seen either (i) as inconsistent with the Transcendental Aesthetic; or (ii) as addressing a question of fact rather than a question of legitimacy; or (iii) as articulating a position that Kant himself criticizes as a form of scepticism. Consideration of the third alternative, in particular, shows that a more promising construal of the Deduction must be based on a different interpretation of Kant’s claim that intuitions and concepts constitute two distinct kinds of representation than is assumed by proponents of nonconceptualist readings. I present such an interpretation and outline the alternative reading of the Deduction that results.

Type
Articles
Copyright
© Kantian Review 2014 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Allais, Lucy (2009) ‘Kant, Non-Conceptual Content, and the Representation of Space’. Journal of the History of Philosophy, 47, 383413.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Allais, Lucy (2011) ‘Transcendental Idealism and the Transcendental Deduction’. In Dennis Schulting and Jacco Verburgt (eds), Kant’s Idealism: New Interpretations of Controversial Doctrine (Dordrecht and New York: Springer), pp. 91107.Google Scholar
Allison, Henry (2004) Kant’s Transcendental Idealism: An Interpretation and Defense, 2nd edn. New Haven: Yale University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bowman, Brady (2011) ‘A Conceptualist Reply to Hanna’s Kantian Nonconceptualism’. International Journal of Philosophical Studies, 19, 417446.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boyle, Matthew (2009) ‘Active Belief’. Canadian Journal of Philosophy Supplementary Volume, 35, 119147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Byrne, Alex (2004) ‘Perception and Conceptual Content’. In Ernest Sosa and Matthias Steup (eds), Contemporary Debates in Epistemology (Oxford: Blackwell), pp. 231250.Google Scholar
Ginsborg, Hannah (2006) ‘Kant and the Problem of Experience’. Philosophical Topics, 34, 59106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ginsborg, Hannah (2008) ‘Was Kant a Nonconceptualist?’. Philosophical Studies, 137, 6577.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gomes, Anil (2010) ‘Is Kant’s Transcendental Deduction of the Categories Fit for Purpose?’. Kantian Review, 15, 118137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffith, Aaron (2012) ‘Perception and the Categories’. European Journal of Philosophy, 20, 193222.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grüne, Stefanie (2009) Blinde Anschauung: Die Rolle von Begriffen in Kants Theorie sinnlicher Synthesis. Frankfurt am Main: Klostermann.Google Scholar
Grüne, Stefanie (2011) ‘Is there a Gap in Kant’s B Deduction?’. International Journal of Philosophical Studies, 19, 465490.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haddock, Adrian (2012) ‘Meaning, Justification, and “Primitive Normativity”’. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume, 86, 147174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hanna, Robert (2005) ‘Kant and Nonconceptual Content’. European Journal of Philosophy, 13, 247290.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hanna, Robert (2008) ‘Kantian Non-Conceptualism’. Philosophical Studies, 137, 4164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hanna, Robert (2011) ‘Kant’s Non-Conceptualism, Rogue Objects, and the Gap in the B Deduction’. International Journal of Philosophical Studies, 19, 399415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Henrich, Dieter (1989) ‘Kant’s Notion of a Deduction and the Methodological Background of the First Critique’. In Eckart Förster (ed.), Kant’s Transcendental Deductions (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press), pp. 2946.Google Scholar
Kant, Immanuel (1902–) Kants gesammelte Schriften, ed.Königlich Preußische Akademie der Wissenschaften. Berlin: de Gruyter and predecessors.Google Scholar
Kant, Immanuel (1998) Critique of Pure Reason, trans. Paul Guyer and Allen Wood. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Land, Thomas (2006) ‘Kant’s Spontaneity Thesis’. Philosophical Topics, 34, 189220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Land, Thomas (forthcoming) ‘No Other Use than in Judgment? Kant on Concepts and Sensible Synthesis’. Journal of the History of Philosophy.Google Scholar
Land, Thomas (n.d.) ‘Intuition, Concepts, and Spatial Representation in Kant’. Unpublished manuscript.Google Scholar
Longuenesse, Beatrice (1998) Kant and the Capacity to Judge. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
McDowell, John (1998) ‘Having the World in View: Sellars, Kant, and Intentionality’. Journal of Philosophy, 95, 431491.Google Scholar
McDowell, John (2007) ‘On Pippin’s Postscript’. European Journal of Philosophy, 15, 395410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McDowell, John (2009) ‘Hegel’s Idealism as a Radicalization of Kant’. In McDowell, Having the World in View: Essays on Kant, Hegel, and Sellars (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press), pp. 6989.Google Scholar
McLear, Colin (2011) ‘Kant on Animal Consciousness’. Philosophers’ Imprint, 11, 116.Google Scholar
McLear, Colin (forthcoming) ‘Two Kinds of Unity in the Critique of Pure Reason’. Journal of the History of Philosophy.Google Scholar
McLear, Colin (n.d.) ‘Form, Matter, and Relation to an Object’. Unpublished manuscript.Google Scholar
Rödl, Sebastian (2007) Self-Consciousness. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Rohs, Peter (2001) ‘Bezieht sich nach Kant die Anschauung unmittelbar auf Gegenstände?’. In Volker Gerhardt, et al. (eds), Kant und die Berliner Aufklärung. Berlin: de Gruyter), ii. pp. 214228.Google Scholar
Sellars, Wilfrid (1978) ‘The Role of Imagination in Kant’s Theory of Experience’. In Henry Johnstone (ed.), Categories: A Colloquium (University Park, PA: Penn State University Press), pp. 231245.Google Scholar
Sellars, Wilfrid (1992) ‘Sensibility and Understanding’. In Sellars Science and Metaphysics: Variations on Kantian Themes (Atascadero, CA: Ridgeview), pp. 130 (originally published in 1967).Google Scholar
Speaks, Jeff (2005) ‘Is there a Problem about Nonconceptual Content?’. Philosophical Review, 114, 359398.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Strawson, Peter (1966) The Bounds of Sense: An Essay on Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. London: Methuen.Google Scholar
Tolley, Clinton (2013) ‘The Non-Conceptuality of the Content of Intuitions’. Kantian Review, 18, 107136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Cleve, James (1999) Problems from Kant. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Walsh, W. H. (1975) Kant’s Criticism of Metaphysics. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Wenzel, Christian Helmut (2005) ‘Spielen nach Kant die Kategorien schon bei der Wahrnehmung eine Rolle? Peter Rohs und John McDowell’. Kant-Studien, 96, 407426.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Winkler, Kenneth (2010) ‘Kant, the Empiricists, and the Enterprise of Deduction’. In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), pp. 4172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 15
Total number of PDF views: 176 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 19th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Nonconceptualist Readings of Kant and the Transcendental Deduction
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Nonconceptualist Readings of Kant and the Transcendental Deduction
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Nonconceptualist Readings of Kant and the Transcendental Deduction
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *