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Impact of Self-Efficacy and Affective Functioning on Pediatric Concussion Symptom Severity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 January 2021

Kesley A. Ramsey*
Affiliation:
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
Christopher Vaughan
Affiliation:
Safe Concussion Outcome Recovery & Education (SCORE) Program, Division of Neuropsychology, Children’s National Hospital, Rockville, MD, USA
Barry M. Wagner
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC, USA
Joseph F. McGuire
Affiliation:
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
Gerard A. Gioia
Affiliation:
Safe Concussion Outcome Recovery & Education (SCORE) Program, Division of Neuropsychology, Children’s National Hospital, Rockville, MD, USA
*
*Correspondence and reprint requests to: Kesley A. Ramsey, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 550 North Broadway, Suite 206, Baltimore, MD21205, USA. E-mail: kramsey7@jhmi.edu

Abstract

Objective:

The purpose of this study was to examine whether self-efficacy predicted pediatric concussion symptom severity and explore whether affective mood states (e.g., depression) influenced this relationship.

Method:

Children (8–17 years) who were diagnosed with a concussion within 30 days of injury participated in the study (n = 105). Following a clinical assessment, participants and caregivers completed questionnaires that assessed overall concussion symptom severity and current depression symptoms. Participants also completed ratings capturing self-efficacy for managing concussion recovery.

Results:

Linear regression models revealed that greater levels of self-efficacy predicted lower parent- (R2 = 0.10, p = .001) and youth-rated (R2 = 0.23, p < .001) concussion symptom severity. Interestingly, depression symptoms moderated the relationship between self-efficacy and concussion symptom severity.

Conclusions:

Findings provide initial support for a relationship between self-efficacy and concussion outcomes and highlight the influence of depressive symptoms. Interventions that optimize youth’s self-efficacy have the potential to increase treatment adherence, reduce concussion symptom severity, and improve recovery prognosis.

Type
Regular Research
Copyright
Copyright © INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2021

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