Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-vpsfw Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-18T02:55:50.219Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

78 BVMT-R Learning Ratio Moderates Cognitive Training Gains in Useful Field of View Task in Healthy Older Adults

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 December 2023

Cheshire Hardcastle*
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
Jessica N. Kraft
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Hanna K. Hausman
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Andrew O’Shea
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Alejandro Albizu
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Nicole D. Evangelista
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Emanuel Boutzoukas
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Emily J. Van Etten
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Tucsan, AZ, USA
Pradyumna K. Bharadwaj
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Tucsan, AZ, USA
Hyun Song
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Tucsan, AZ, USA
Samantha G. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Tucsan, AZ, USA
Eric Porges
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Steven DeKosky
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Georg A. Hishaw
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Tucsan, AZ, USA
Samuel Wu
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Michael Marsiske
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Ronald Cohen
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Gene E. Alexander
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Tucsan, AZ, USA
Adam J. Woods
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
*
Correspondence: Cheshire Hardcastle, University of Florida, chardcastle@ufl.edu
Rights & Permissions [Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Core share and HTML view are not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Objective:

Cognitive training using a visual speed-of-processing task, called the Useful Field of View (UFOV) task, reduced dementia risk and reduced decline in activities of daily living at a 10-year follow-up in older adults. However, there is variability in the level of cognitive gains after cognitive training across studies. One potential explanation for this variability could be moderating factors. Prior studies suggest variables moderating cognitive training gains share features of the training task. Learning trials of the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R) and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R) recruit similar cognitive abilities and have overlapping neural correlates with the UFOV task and speed-ofprocessing/working memory tasks and therefore could serve as potential moderators. Exploring moderating factors of cognitive training gains may boost the efficacy of interventions, improve rigor in the cognitive training literature, and eventually help provide tailored treatment recommendations. This study explored the association between the HVLT-R and BVMT-R learning and the UFOV task, and assessed the moderation of HVLT-R and BVMT-R learning on UFOV improvement after a 3-month speed-ofprocessing/attention and working memory cognitive training intervention in cognitively healthy older adults.

Participants and Methods:

75 healthy older adults (M age = 71.11, SD = 4.61) were recruited as part of a larger clinical trial through the Universities of Florida and Arizona. Participants were randomized into a cognitive training (n=36) or education control (n=39) group and underwent a 40-hour, 12-week intervention. Cognitive training intervention consisted of practicing 4 attention/speed-of-processing (including the UFOV task) and 4 working memory tasks. Education control intervention consisted of watching 40-minute educational videos. The HVLT-R and BVMT-R were administered at the pre-intervention timepoint as part of a larger neurocognitive battery. The learning ratio was calculated as: trial 3 total - trial 1 total/12 - trial 1 total. UFOV performance was measured at pre- and post-intervention time points via the POSIT Brain HQ Double Decision Assessment. Multiple linear regressions predicted baseline Double Decision performance from HVLT-R and BVMT-R learning ratios controlling for study site, age, sex, and education. A repeated measures moderation analysis assessed the moderation of HVLT-R and BVMT-R learning ratio on Double Decision change from pre- to post-intervention for cognitive training and education control groups.

Results:

Baseline Double Decision performance significantly associated with BVMT-R learning ratio (β=-.303, p=.008), but not HVLT-R learning ratio (β=-.142, p=.238). BVMT-R learning ratio moderated gains in Double Decision performance (p<.01); for each unit increase in BVMT-R learning ratio, there was a .6173 unit decrease in training gains. The HVLT-R learning ratio did not moderate gains in Double Decision performance (p>.05). There were no significant moderations in the education control group.

Conclusions:

Better visuospatial learning was associated with faster Double Decision performance at baseline. Those with poorer visuospatial learning improved most on the Double Decision task after training, suggesting that healthy older adults who perform below expectations may show the greatest training gains. Future cognitive training research studying visual speed-of-processing interventions should account for differing levels of visuospatial learning at baseline, as this could impact the magnitude of training outcomes.

Type
Poster Session 01: Medical | Neurological Disorders | Neuropsychiatry | Psychopharmacology
Copyright
Copyright © INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2023