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Calcareous microfossils from the Upper Mississippian (Chesterian) Maxville Limestone, southeastern Ohio

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2015


R. D. Hoare
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403
Betty Skipp
Affiliation:
U.S. Geological Survey, Box 25046, MS 913, Denver, Colorado 80225

Abstract

A low-diversity assemblage of smaller calcareous microfossils is present in the Upper Mississippian Maxville Limestone in Muskingum and Perry Counties, southeastern Ohio. Diagnostic faunal elements that suggest an early Chesterian age include the foraminifers Neoarchaediscus maxvillensis n. sp., Paraarchaediscus aff. P. Pachytheca (Petryk), Paraarchaediscus cf. P. koktjubensis (Rauzer-Chernousova), Endothyra excellens (Zeller), Endothyra bowmani Phillips emend. Brady, and attached forms. The presence of these diagnostic faunal elements in the Chesterian of Ohio significantly extends their known geographic range into the eastern Midcontinent region.

Other forms present include the foraminifers Priscella? of the group P. prisca (Rauzer-Chernousova and Reitlinger), Diplosphaerina inaequalis (Derville), Earlandia spp., and the problematic Asphaltinoides macadami (Brenckle and Groves) and Salebra irregularis Bogush and Brenckle. Microfossils are present in both calcareous mudstone and limestone.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

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