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Retorting conditions affect palatability and physical characteristics of canned cat food

  • Esther A. Hagen-Plantinga (a1), Denmark F. Orlanes (a2), Guido Bosch (a2), Wouter H. Hendriks (a1) (a2) and Antonius F. B. van der Poel (a2)...

Abstract

The effects of different temperature and time conditions during retorting of canned cat food on physicochemical characteristics and palatability were examined. For this purpose, lacquer cans containing an unprocessed loaf-type commercial cat food were heated in a pressurised retorting system at three specified temperature–time profiles (113°C/232 min, 120°C/103 min and 127°C/60 min) to equal a similar lethality (F 0 value = 30). Physicochemical properties (viscosity, texture, particle size, pH) were determined, and a 10 d three-bowl palatability test was performed with ten European shorthair cats. Retorting at 113°C/232 min resulted in differences in all the physical parameters examined (<viscosity, firmness, adhesiveness, and > particle size). Significant pH differences were observed (6·53, 6·63 and 6·66 for T113/232, 120 and 127°C, respectively). Preference ratios were 0·38, 0·31 and 0·31 for T113/232, 120 and 127°C, respectively (P = 0·067). It can be concluded that different retorting temperature–time profiles with equal F 0 value significantly affect physical characteristics and tended to affect palatability of moist cat food.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Dr A. F. B. van der Poel, fax +31 317 484260, email Thomas.vanderpoel@wur.nl

References

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Keywords

Retorting conditions affect palatability and physical characteristics of canned cat food

  • Esther A. Hagen-Plantinga (a1), Denmark F. Orlanes (a2), Guido Bosch (a2), Wouter H. Hendriks (a1) (a2) and Antonius F. B. van der Poel (a2)...

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