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Effects of dietary supplementation with a mixed blueberry and grape extract on working memory in aged beagle dogs

  • V. Fragua (a1), A. Lepoudère (a1), V. Leray (a2), C. Baron (a1), J. A. Araujo (a3) (a4), P. Nguyen (a2) and N. W. Milgram (a3)...

Abstract

Cellular oxidative damage is thought to be one of the key mechanisms underlying age-related cognitive impairment in dogs. Several nutritional interventions to limit cognitive decline are reported in the literature. To our knowledge, the association of grape and blueberry extracts has never been tested in aged dogs. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of a polyphenol-rich extract from grape and blueberry (PEGB) on oxidative status and cognitive performances in aged dogs. A total of thirty-five beagle dogs (aged 8·0–14·5 years) were fed a basal diet with PEGB at either 0 parts per million (ppm) (n 11; control), 240 ppm (n 12; PEGB1) or 480 ppm (n 12; PEGB2) for 75 d. To investigate the effects of PEGB supplementation on cognition and oxidative status, a delayed non-matching to position (DNMP) test and RT-PCR on genes involved in oxidative stress were evaluated. The dogs fed PEGB1 showed a higher superoxide dismutase mRNA expression compared with dogs fed PEGB2 (P = 0·042) and with the control group (P = 0·014). Moreover, the dogs fed PEGB2 showed higher nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) mRNA expression compared with the dogs fed PEGB1 (P = 0·027). Concerning the DNMP test, the proportion of dogs showing cognitive improvements relative to their baseline level was significantly higher in dogs fed the PEGB, regardless of the dosage, than in dogs receiving no supplementation (P = 0·030). The results obtained in the DNMP test suggested a potential benefit of the PEGB on working memory. However, this hypothesis should be further investigated to confirm this cognitive effect.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Dr V. Fragua, email vfragua@diana-petfood.com

Footnotes

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Both authors contributed equally.

Footnotes

References

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Supplementary materials

Fragua supplementary material S1
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Supplementary materials

Fragua supplementary material S2
Appendix

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Effects of dietary supplementation with a mixed blueberry and grape extract on working memory in aged beagle dogs

  • V. Fragua (a1), A. Lepoudère (a1), V. Leray (a2), C. Baron (a1), J. A. Araujo (a3) (a4), P. Nguyen (a2) and N. W. Milgram (a3)...

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