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Cluster analysis of polyphenol intake in a French middle-aged population (aged 35–64 years)

  • Chantal Julia (a1) (a2), Mathilde Touvier (a1), Camille Lassale (a1), Léopold Fezeu (a1), Pilar Galan (a1), Serge Hercberg (a1) (a2) and Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot (a1)...

Abstract

Polyphenols have been suggested as protective factors for a range of chronic diseases. However, studying the impact of individual polyphenols on health is hindered by the intrinsic inter-correlations among polyphenols. Alternatively, studying foods rich in specific polyphenols fails to grasp the ubiquity of these components. Studying overall dietary patterns would allow for a more comprehensive description of polyphenol intakes in the population. Our objective was to identify clusters of dietary polyphenol intakes in a French middle-aged population (35–64 years old). Participants from the primary prevention trial SUpplementation en VItamines et Minéraux AntioXydants (SU.VI.MAX) study were included in the present cross-sectional study (n 6092; 57·8 % females; mean age 48·7 (sd 6·4) years). The fifty most consumed individual dietary polyphenols were divided into energy-adjusted tertiles and introduced in a multiple correspondence analysis (MCA), leading to comprehensive factors of dietary polyphenol intakes. The identified factors discriminating polyphenol intakes were used in a hierarchical clustering procedure. Four clusters were identified, corresponding broadly to clustered preferences for their respective food sources. Cluster 1 was characterised by high intakes of tea polyphenols. Cluster 2 was characterised by high intakes of wine polyphenols. Cluster 3 was characterised by high intakes of flavanones and flavones, corresponding to high consumption of fruit and vegetables, and more broadly to a healthier diet. Cluster 4 was characterised by high intakes of hydroxycinnamic acids, but was also associated with alcohol consumption and smoking. Profiles of polyphenol intakes allowed for the identification of meaningful combinations of polyphenol intakes in the diet.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: C. Julia, email c.julia@uren.smbh.univ-paris13.fr

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Cluster analysis of polyphenol intake in a French middle-aged population (aged 35–64 years)

  • Chantal Julia (a1) (a2), Mathilde Touvier (a1), Camille Lassale (a1), Léopold Fezeu (a1), Pilar Galan (a1), Serge Hercberg (a1) (a2) and Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot (a1)...

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