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The Graetz–Nusselt problem extended to continuum flows with finite slip

  • A. Sander Haase (a1), S. Jonathan Chapman (a2), Peichun Amy Tsai (a1), Detlef Lohse (a3) and Rob G. H. Lammertink (a1)...

Abstract

Graetz and Nusselt studied heat transfer between a developed laminar fluid flow and a tube at constant wall temperature. Here, we extend the Graetz–Nusselt problem to dense fluid flows with partial wall slip. Its limits correspond to the classical problems for no-slip and no-shear flow. The amount of heat transfer is expressed by the local Nusselt number $\mathit{Nu}_{x}$ , which is defined as the ratio of convective to conductive radial heat transfer. In the thermally developing regime, $\mathit{Nu}_{x}$ scales with the ratio of position $\tilde{x}=x/L$ to Graetz number $\mathit{Gz}$ , i.e.  $\mathit{Nu}_{x}\propto (\tilde{x}/\mathit{Gz})^{-{\it\beta}}$ . Here, $L$ is the length of the heated or cooled tube section. The Graetz number $\mathit{Gz}$ corresponds to the ratio of axial advective to radial diffusive heat transport. In the case of no slip, the scaling exponent ${\it\beta}$ equals $1/3$ . For no-shear flow, ${\it\beta}=1/2$ . The results show that for partial slip, where the ratio of slip length $b$ to tube radius $R$ ranges from zero to infinity, ${\it\beta}$ transitions from $1/3$ to $1/2$ when $10^{-4}<b/R<10^{0}$ . For partial slip, ${\it\beta}$ is a function of both position and slip length. The developed Nusselt number $\mathit{Nu}_{\infty }$ for $\tilde{x}/\mathit{Gz}>0.1$ transitions from 3.66 to 5.78, the classical limits, when $10^{-2}<b/R<10^{2}$ . A mathematical and physical explanation is provided for the distinct transition points for ${\it\beta}$ and $\mathit{Nu}_{\infty }$ .

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Email address for correspondence: r.g.h.lammertink@utwente.nl

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The Graetz–Nusselt problem extended to continuum flows with finite slip

  • A. Sander Haase (a1), S. Jonathan Chapman (a2), Peichun Amy Tsai (a1), Detlef Lohse (a3) and Rob G. H. Lammertink (a1)...

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