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Scanning microwave microscopy of buried CMOS interconnect lines with nanometer resolution

  • Xin Jin (a1), Kuanchen Xiong (a1), Roderick Marstell (a1), Nicholas C. Strandwitz (a1), James C. M. Hwang (a1), Marco Farina (a2), Alexander Göritz (a3), Matthias Wietstruck (a3) and Mehmet Kaynak (a3)...

Abstract

This paper reports scanning microwave microscopy of CMOS interconnect aluminum lines both bare and buried under oxide. In both cases, a spatial resolution of 190 ± 70 nm was achieved, which was comparable or better than what had been reported in the literature. With the lines immersed in water to simulate high-k dielectric, the signal-to-noise ratio degraded significantly, but the image remained as sharp as before, especially after averaging across a few adjacent scans. These results imply that scanning microwave microscopy can be a promising technique for non-destructive nano-characterization of both CMOS interconnects buried under oxide and live biological samples immersed in water.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Xin Jin, E-mail: xij215@lehigh.edu

References

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[1]Turkane, SM and Kureshi, AK (2017) Emerging interconnects: a state-of-the-art review and emerging solutions. International Journal of Electronics 104, 11071119.
[2]Smoliner, J, Huber, HP, Hochleitner, M, Moertelmaier, M and Kienberger, F (2010) Scanning microwave microscopy/spectroscopy on metal-oxide-semiconductor systems. Journal of Applied Physics 108, 064315-1–064315-1.
[3]You, L, Ahn, J-J, Obeng, YS and Kopanski, JJ (2016) Subsurface imaging of metal lines embedded in a dielectric with a scanning microwave microscope. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics 49, 045502-1–045502-11.
[4]Jin, X, Xiong, K, Marstell, R, Strandwitz, N, Hwang, JCM, Farina, M, Göritz, A, Wietstruck, M and Kaynak, M (2017) Scanning microwave microscopy of aluminum CMOS interconnect lines buried in oxide and water, European Microwave Conference (EUMC), Nuremberg, Germany.
[5]Mai, A and Kaynak, M (2016) SiGe-BiCMOS based technology platforms for mm-wave and radar applications, International Conference on Microwave, Radar and Wireless Communications (MIKON), Krakow, Poland.
[6]Ellison, W (2007) Permittivity of pure water, at standard atmospheric pressure, over the frequency range 0–25 THz and the temperature range 0–100 °C. Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data 36, 118.
[7]Lai, K, Kundhikanjana, W, Kelly, MA and Shen, ZX (2008) Calibration of shielded microwave probes using bulk dielectrics. Applied Physics Letters 93, 123105-1–123105-3.
[8]Tuca, S-S, Gramse, G, Kasper, M, Brinciotti, E, Oh, Y-J, Campagnaro, GM, Badino, G, Hinterdorfer, P and Kienberger, F (2015) Single E-coli bacteria imaged at 20 GHz frequency using the scanning microwave microscope (SMM). Microscopy and Analysis 29(4), 912.

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Scanning microwave microscopy of buried CMOS interconnect lines with nanometer resolution

  • Xin Jin (a1), Kuanchen Xiong (a1), Roderick Marstell (a1), Nicholas C. Strandwitz (a1), James C. M. Hwang (a1), Marco Farina (a2), Alexander Göritz (a3), Matthias Wietstruck (a3) and Mehmet Kaynak (a3)...

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