Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Revealing the Role of Context, Experience and Individual Differences in the Assessment of Heroin Addicts’ Decision Making Abilities

  • C.G.J. Newman (a1), I. Crome (a1) and M. Frisher (a2)

Abstract

The development of decision making paradigms has prompted a consideration that an underlying deficit may assist in explaining substance dependence. However, despite these advances, little progress has been made in accounting for large inter-subject variance within previous studies. This failure continues to undermine many of the previous attempts to explain individual difference.

A study was undertaken to develop methods for analysing and describing individual response behaviours within a decision-making task. In addition, the effect of task manipulations such as feedback, penalties and practice were examined. Substitute medication maintained adults males were recruited for this study.

Findings from this research offer new insight into a possible link between task design and the response behaviours exhibited. This study emphasised the importance of individual response behaviours, and the necessity to consider individual data as a route to understanding concepts drawn from between groups analysis. Significant issues are raised that might impact on other existing paradigms and implications are proposed in relation to the assessment and treatment of substance dependence.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Revealing the Role of Context, Experience and Individual Differences in the Assessment of Heroin Addicts’ Decision Making Abilities
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Revealing the Role of Context, Experience and Individual Differences in the Assessment of Heroin Addicts’ Decision Making Abilities
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Revealing the Role of Context, Experience and Individual Differences in the Assessment of Heroin Addicts’ Decision Making Abilities
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Revealing the Role of Context, Experience and Individual Differences in the Assessment of Heroin Addicts’ Decision Making Abilities

  • C.G.J. Newman (a1), I. Crome (a1) and M. Frisher (a2)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.

Revealing the Role of Context, Experience and Individual Differences in the Assessment of Heroin Addicts’ Decision Making Abilities

  • C.G.J. Newman (a1), I. Crome (a1) and M. Frisher (a2)
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *