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P03-104 - Linguistic Production and Comprehension Deficits in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 April 2020

C. Perlini
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Public Health, Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, University of Verona and DPMSC, Section of Psychiatry, University of Udine, Verona and Udine, Italy
A. Marini
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, University of Udine, Udine, Italy Scientific Institute, IRCCS “E. Medea”, Udine, Italy
F. Fabbro
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, University of Udine, Udine, Italy Scientific Institute, IRCCS “E. Medea”, Udine, Italy
M. Garzitto
Affiliation:
Scientific Institute, IRCCS “E. Medea”, Udine, Italy
S. Cerruti
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Public Health, Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, University of Verona and DPMSC, Section of Psychiatry, University of Udine, Verona and Udine, Italy
V. Marinelli
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Public Health, Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, University of Verona and DPMSC, Section of Psychiatry, University of Udine, Verona and Udine, Italy
G. Rambaldelli
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Public Health, Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, University of Verona and DPMSC, Section of Psychiatry, University of Udine, Verona and Udine, Italy
A. Ferro
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Public Health, Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, University of Verona and DPMSC, Section of Psychiatry, University of Udine, Verona and Udine, Italy
L. Tomelleri
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Public Health, Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, University of Verona and DPMSC, Section of Psychiatry, University of Udine, Verona and Udine, Italy
M. Bellani
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Public Health, Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, University of Verona and DPMSC, Section of Psychiatry, University of Udine, Verona and Udine, Italy
M. Tansella
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Public Health, Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, University of Verona and DPMSC, Section of Psychiatry, University of Udine, Verona and Udine, Italy
P. Brambilla
Affiliation:
Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, University of Verona and DPMSC, Section of Psychiatry, University of Udine, Verona and Udine, Italy DPMSC, Section of Psychiatry, University of Udine, Udine, Italy

Abstract

Introduction

Although language deficits have often been reported in schizophrenia, the specific relevance of single linguistic levels of processing is still under debate. Moreover, little is known about language disturbances in bipolar disorder.

Objectives

The aims of this study were to:

  1. 1) investigate micro-linguistic (lexicon, morphology, syntax) and macro-linguistic (discourse coherence, pragmatics) dimensions of speech production and

  2. 2) evaluate syntactic comprehension skills in both schizophrenia and, for the first time, bipolar disorder.

Methods

A story telling task and a computer-based test of syntactic comprehension were administered to 30 Italian speaking DSM-IV patients suffering from schizophrenia, 30 participants with bipolar disorder and 30 healthy controls, comparable for age and educational level (p>0.05). Analysis of variance with post-hoc correction was performed to compare linguistic performance between groups.

Results

In comparison to healthy participants, patients with schizophrenia had significantly impaired productivity, syntactic complexity and local/global discourse coherence and bipolar disorder subjects showed deficits in mean length of utterance (p< 0.05). Also, both groups of patients collected more grammatical errors than controls (p< 0.05), but they differed in regard to the grammatical type of construction they missed (passive-affirmative and active-negative, respectively).

Conclusions

Our results showed the presence of both micro and macro-linguistic deficits in linguistic production in schizophrenia, but not in bipolar disorder, suggesting that these abnormalities are specific for schizophrenia. On the contrary, syntactic construction comprehension was altered in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, potentially representing the target of innovative rehabilitation strategies.

Type
Psychotic disorders / Schizophrenia
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2010
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