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Introduction: Epistemic Relativism

  • Frederick F. Schmitt

Extract

This issue of Episteme is devoted to the topic of epistemic relativism. It includes a symposium on Paul Boghossian's treatment of epistemic relativism in chapters 5 through 7 of his new book, Fear of Knowledge (2006). The symposium centers on Boghossian's argument against epistemic relativism in chapter 6 of that book. In their contributions to the symposium, Gideon Rosen and Ram Neta offer criticisms of Boghossian's argument, and Neta argues for a version of epistemic relativism. In addition to the symposium, Jonathan Weinberg, Michael Williams, and Roger White supply stand-alone articles on related topics. The purpose of this introduction is to situate epistemic relativism in the constellation of relativist views, to distinguish several forms of epistemic relativism, and to remark briefly on how the versions of relativism discussed in the articles in this issue fit these forms of relativism.

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Copyright

References

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Boghossian, Paul. 2006. Fear of Knowledge: Against Relativism and Constructivism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Broadie, Sarah. 2003. “Sophists and Socrates.” Pp. 7397 in The Cambridge Companion to Greek and Roman Philosophy, ed. Sedley, David. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Burnyeat, Miles. 1976. “Protagoras and Self-refutation in Plato's Theaetetus.” Philosophical Review 85: 172195.
Hales, S. D. 1997. “A Consistent Relativism.” Mind 106: 3352.
Plato., 1973. Theaetetus, trans. with notes by McDowell, John. Oxford: Clarendon.
Schmitt, Frederick F. 1995. Truth: A Primer. Boulder, Colorado: Westview.
Siegel, Harvey. 2004. “Relativism.” Pp. 747780 in Handbook of Epistemology, ed. Niiniluoto, Ilkka, Sintonen, Matti, and Woleński, Jan. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
Williams, Michael. 1996. Unnatural Doubts: Epistemological Realism and the Basis of Scepticism. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

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