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Clinical significance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in residents in community long-term-care facilities in Spain

  • A. MANZUR (a1), E. RUIZ DE GOPEGUI (a2), M. DOMINGUEZ (a3), D. MARISCAL (a4), L. GAVALDA (a5), J. L. PEREZ (a2), F. SEGURA (a6), M. PUJOL (a1) and the Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases...

Summary

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is highly prevalent in Spanish hospitals and community long-term-care facilities (LTCFs). This longitudinal study was performed in community LTCFs to determine whether MRSA colonization is associated with MRSA infections and overall mortality. Nasal and decubitus ulcer cultures were performed every 6 months for an 18-month period on 178 MRSA-colonized residents (86 490 patient-days) and 196 non-MRSA carriers (97 470 patient-days). Fourteen residents developed MRSA infections and 10 of these were skin and soft tissue infections. Two patients with respiratory infections required hospitalization. The incidence rate of MRSA infection was 0·12/1000 patient-days in MRSA carriers and 0·05/1000 patient-days in non-carriers (P=0·46). No difference in MRSA infection rate was found according to the duration of MRSA colonization (P=0·69). The mortality rate was 20·8% in colonized residents and 16·8% in non-carriers; four residents with MRSA infection died. Overall mortality was statistically similar in both cohorts. Our results suggest that despite a high prevalence of MRSA colonization in LTCFs, MRSA infections are neither frequent nor severe while colonized residents remain at the facility. The epidemiological impact of an MRSA reservoir is more relevant than the clinical impact of this colonization for an individual resident and supports current recommendations to control MRSA spread in community LTCFs.

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Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr A. Manzur, Infectious Disease Service, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Feixa Llarga s/n, L′Hospitalet de Llobregat Barcelona, 08907, Spain. (Email: admanzur@yahoo.com.ar)

References

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Keywords

Clinical significance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in residents in community long-term-care facilities in Spain

  • A. MANZUR (a1), E. RUIZ DE GOPEGUI (a2), M. DOMINGUEZ (a3), D. MARISCAL (a4), L. GAVALDA (a5), J. L. PEREZ (a2), F. SEGURA (a6), M. PUJOL (a1) and the Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases...

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