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Training the New Conservationist: Cross-disciplinary Education in the 1990s

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 August 2009

Susan K. Jacobson
Affiliation:
Assistant Director, Program for Studies in Tropical Conservation, Department of Wildlife and Range Sciences, 118 Newins-Ziegler Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA
John G. Robinson
Affiliation:
Director, Program for Studies in Tropical Conservation, 118 Newins-Ziegler Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA. Present address: Director, Wildlife Conservation International, New York Zoological Society, Bronx, NY 10460, USA.

Extract

The need for an integrated approach to ecological conservation and natural resource development is becoming widely recognized as environmental and social problems become more and more acute with human population pressures and depletion of resources. While a number of academic programmes addressing environmental problems have been operating for several decades, comprehensive approaches that integrate conservation with development issues are only just beginning to occur. These innovative, cross-disciplinary problem-solving approaches still face a number of traditional constraints to successful programme development. Obstacles occur in every major aspect of academia — including structure, communication, reward systems, research, curriculum, and evaluation.

Type
Main Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Foundation for Environmental Conservation 1990

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