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  • ISSN: 0266-0784 (Print), 1474-0567 (Online)
  • Editor: Professor Andrew Moody University of Macau, China
  • Editorial board
English Today provides accessible cutting-edge reports on all aspects of the language, including style, usage, dictionaries, literary language, Plain English, the Internet and language teaching, in terms of British, American and the world’s many other Englishes. Its global readership includes linguists, journalists, broadcasters, writers, publishers, teachers, advanced students of the language and others with a professional or personal interest in communication. Its debates are vigorous and it is noted for its reader involvement. Now in its fourth decade, English Today, remains unique in its scope and style.

Other applied linguistics journals from Cambridge

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • The Cambridge Studies of Language Practices and Social Development
  • 15 June 2020, Rachel
  • The Cambridge Studies of Language Practices and Social Development series provides a needed platform for scholarly discussions around the relationship between Cambridge Extra spoke to the series editor Meng Ji (The University of Sydney, Australia) about the series. What has motivated the development of the series? Our series promotes innovative focused research to address practical social problems such as global environmental, health and legal issues which represent new research challenges, as well as opportunities for socially oriented language practice research. This . . . → Read More: The Cambridge Studies of Language Practices and Social Development...
  • Black Lives Matter
  • 11 June 2020, Rachel
  • Written by Karen Stollznow, author of ‘On the Offensive‘ What do people mean when they say, “Black Lives Matter?” “Black Lives Matter” is a slogan and a social movement in response to the historical and current social and systemic racism and violence perpetuated against Black people. Where did the phrase come from? In 2012, 17-year-old African-American Trayvon Martin was walking home in Sanford, Florida, having just purchased a packet of Skittles from a convenience store. He was spotted by local resident George Zimmerman who reported Martin to local police as “suspicious.” Martin was innocent of any crime, although Zimmerman confronted the young man and fatally shot him, claiming the act was in self-defense. He was acquitted of his crime. Following this incident the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter . . . → Read More: Black Lives Matter...