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  • ISSN: 0266-0784 (Print), 1474-0567 (Online)
  • Editor: Professor Andrew Moody University of Macau, China
  • Editorial board
English Today provides accessible cutting-edge reports on all aspects of the language, including style, usage, dictionaries, literary language, Plain English, the Internet and language teaching, in terms of British, American and the world’s many other Englishes. Its global readership includes linguists, journalists, broadcasters, writers, publishers, teachers, advanced students of the language and others with a professional or personal interest in communication. Its debates are vigorous and it is noted for its reader involvement. Now in its fourth decade, English Today, remains unique in its scope and style.

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