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A FRESH LOOK AT E. FRANKLIN FRAZIER'S SEXUAL POLITICS IN THE NEGRO FAMILY IN THE UNITED STATES

  • Anastasia Curwood (a1)

Abstract

This article brings Frazier's ideas about male and female family roles into focus. Although Frazier was at the forefront of arguing for racial equality in the 1930s, his ideas remained limited by his belief that African Americans should assimilate into the gender and sexual ideals of patriarchal U.S. culture. At the center of this article is Frazier's conviction that middle-class egalitarian marriages, women's participation in the waged work force, and increased consumption of material goods would perpetuate or worsen African Americans' family health. Importantly, this article argues that Frazier's socialist political alignments and his suspicion of bourgeois norms were inseparable from his suspicion of middle-class Black women and notions of morality. Ultimately, it suggests that his mistrust of women colors social scientists' treatments of Black Americans throughout the twentieth century.

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Corresponding author

Professor Anastasia Curwood, Department of African American and Diaspora Studies, Vanderbilt University, VU Station B, Box 351516, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37235-1516. E-mail: a.curwood@vanderbilt.edu

References

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