Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The Swan Brand: Reframing the Legacy of Anna Pavlova

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2012

Get access

Extract

How does legendary status evolve in the world of ballet? Are the most brilliant dance figures simply bound to be recognized by the public and discerning critics alike? Or does historical importance depend on specific strategies? Or on the serendipity of circumstance? Joan Acocella notes that genius owes much to “ego strength” as well as luck (2007, xii). Perhaps the element of fame is always interlocked with market forces, even in the dance world, where artists are affected by what is written about them, whether it appears in influential places, and how much can be gained by selling an image. But how does history arrive at the consideration of a dance legend's substance and contributions? Being respected in the long run might inevitably depend on a combination of circumstances, including whether the popular imagination or the attention of academics can be captured. In the case of Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova, a legend has grown around a particular set of glorifying associations. My question here is whether or not these associations, while celebrating Pavlova as a dance “star,” have also limited consideration of her as a significant figure in dance history. Often categorized as “old-fashioned” and “conservative,” Pavlova was in fact an innovator, I suggest, in terms of the way she combined ballet and dance influences from around the world, as well as her role in revivals of neglected dance forms, and, lastly, in her rhetorical framing of ballet as a serious endeavor and an empowering pursuit for women.


Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Congress on Research in Dance 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Acocella, Joan. 2007. Twenty-Eight Artists and Two Saints: Essays. New York: Pantheon BooksGoogle Scholar
Acocella, Joan. 2010. “The Showman: How Diaghilev Came to Dance,” The New Yorker, Sept. 20: 112–6.Google Scholar
Albright, Ann Cooper. 2007. Traces of Light: Absence and Presence in the Work of Loïe Fuller. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press.Google Scholar
Algeranoff, H. 1957. My Years with Pavlova. Melbourne, London, Toronto: William Heinemann Ltd.Google Scholar
Anderson, Jack. 1986. Ballet and Modern Dance: A Concise History. Princeton, NJ: Princeton Book Company.Google Scholar
Ashley, Merrill. 1984. Dancing for Balanchine. New York: Dutton.Google Scholar
Au, Susan. 1988. Ballet and Modern Dance. London, New York: Thames and Hudson.Google Scholar
Barrie, James M. 1962. “The Truth about the Russian Dancers.” In Dance Perspectives 14. New York: Dance Perspectives, Inc.Google Scholar
Bennett, Tony. 1982. “Text and Social Process: The Case of James Bond.” Screen Education 41(Winter/Spring): 314.Google Scholar
Brandstetter, Gabriele. 2010. “Dancing the Animal to Open the Human: For a New Poetics of Locomotion.” Dance Research Journal 42(1): 311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coorlawala, Uttara Asha. 1992. “Ruth St. Denis and India's Dance Renaissance.” Dance Chronicle 15(2): 123–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dandré, Victor. 1979 (first published 1932). Anna Pavlova in Art and Life. New York: Arno Press.Google Scholar
Dixon Gottschild, Brenda. 1996. Digging the Africanist Presence in American Performance: Dance and Other Contexts. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.Google Scholar
Dyer, Richard. 1997. White: Essays on Race and Culture. London and: Routledge.Google Scholar
Erdman, John L. 1996. “Dance Discourses: Rethinking the History of the ‘Oriental Dance.’” In Moving Words: Re-writing Dance, ed. Morris, Gay, 288304. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Fisher, Jennifer. 1998. “The Annual Nutcracker: A participant-oriented, contextualized study of The Nutcracker ballet as it has evolved into a Christmas Ritual in the United States and Canada,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Riverside.Google Scholar
Fisher, Jennifer. 2003. Nutcracker Nation: How an Old World Ballet Became a Christmas Tradition in the New World. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Fisher, Jennifer. 2007. “Tulle as Tool: Embracing the Conflict of the Ballerina as Powerhouse.” Dance Research Journal 39(1): 324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fokine, Michel, translated by Fokine, Vitale, ed. Chujoy, Anatole. 1961. Memoirs of a Ballet Master. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.Google Scholar
Frame, Murray. 2006. School for Citizens: Theatre and Civil Society in Imperial Russia. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Garafola, Lynn. 1989. Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
George, Nadine. 2000. The Royalty of Negro Vaudeville: The Whitman Sisters and the Negotiation of Race, Gender and Class in African American Theatre 19001940. New York: St. Martin's Press.Google Scholar
Gopal, Ram, interviewed by Pinsker, Adam. July 4, 1976. Oral History Project, Dance Collection, New York Public Library, MGZMT 3-1180.Google Scholar
Hammergren, Lena. 2004. “Many Sources, Many Voices.” In Rethinking Dance History: A Reader, ed. Carter, Alexandra, 2031. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Hyden, Walford. 1931. Pavlova: The Genius of Dance. London: Constable and Co. Ltd.Google Scholar
Jarvinen, Hanna. 2010. “Failed Impressions: Diaghilev's Ballets Russes in America, 1916.” Dance Research Journal 42(2): 77108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kant, Marion. 2004. “German Dance and Modernity: Don't Mention the Nazis.” In Rethinking Dance History: A Reader. London, New York: Routledge: 107118.Google Scholar
Karina, Lilian, and Kant, Marion. 2003. Hitler's Dancers: Modern Dance and the Third Reich. BerghahnCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Karsavina, Tamara. 1950. Theatre Street: The Reminiscences of Tamara Karsavina. London: Readers Union Constable.Google Scholar
Keller, Kevin Lane. 2008. Strategic Branding Management: Building, Measuring, and Managing Brand Equity (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Kraus, Richard, Hilsendager, Sarah Chapman, and Dixon, Brenda. 1991. History of the Dance in Art and Education, (3rd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Lakoff, George. 1987. Women, Fire, and Dangerous Things. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Money, Keith. 1982. Anna Pavlova: Her Life and Art. New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
Oliveroff, Andre (as told to John Gill). 1932. Flight of the Swan: A Memory of Pavlova. New York: E.P. Dutton.Google Scholar
O'Shaughnessy, John and O'Shaughnessy, Nicholas Jackson. 2003. The Marketing Power of Emotion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
O'Shea, Janet. 2007. At Home in the World: Bharata Natyam on the Global Stage. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press.Google Scholar
Rosalavleva, Natalia. 1966. Era of the Russian Ballet. New York: E.P. Dutton.Google Scholar
Rosenblatt, Louise M. 1994 (originally published 1978). The Reader, the Text, the Poem: The Transactional Theory of the Literary Work. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
Scheijen, Sjeng. 2010. Diaghilev: A Life. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Svetloff, V. 1974 (first published in 1922). Anna Pavlova. New York: Dover.Google Scholar
Torchinsky, Oleg. August 18, 2008. “Anna Pavlova, The Dying Swan that Conquered India.” Arts column, Diplomatrus, http://www.diplomatrus.com.Google Scholar
Twitchell, James B. 2004. Branded Nation: The Marketing of Megachurch, College Inc., and Museumworld. New York: Simon & Schuster.Google Scholar
Tye, Larry. 1998. The Father of Spin: Edward L. Bernays and the Birth of Public Relations. New York: Henry Holt.Google Scholar
Volynsky, Akim. 2008. Ballet's Magic Kingdom: Selected Writings on Dance in Russia, 1911–1925, with Rabinowitz, Stanley J.. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Ward, Lady Patricia. 1931. “Swan Dies of GriefThe Daily Mail, May 20.Google Scholar
Wiley, Roland John. 1985. Tchaikovsky's Ballets: Swan Lake, Sleeping Beauty, Nutcracker. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 7
Total number of PDF views: 84 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 5th December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-b4dcdd7-zcwv2 Total loading time: 0.332 Render date: 2020-12-05T06:56:29.909Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Sat Dec 05 2020 06:00:11 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Swan Brand: Reframing the Legacy of Anna Pavlova
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The Swan Brand: Reframing the Legacy of Anna Pavlova
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The Swan Brand: Reframing the Legacy of Anna Pavlova
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *