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Social Determinants of Traumatic Brain Injury in the North American Indigenous Population: A Review

  • Kaitlin J. Zeiler (a1) and Frederick A. Zeiler (a2) (a3) (a4)

Abstract

Objective: Given the difficult to navigate literature on social determinants in Indigenous traumatic brain injury (TBI) we wished to identify all available literature on the social determinants of health linked to TBI in the North American Indigenous populations. Methods: We performed a systematically conducted review. We searched MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, SCOPUS, and Cochrane Library from inception to January 2016. A two-step review process of the search results was performed, applying defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. The final group of articles had the data extracted and summarized. Results: Ten manuscripts were identified to discuss some social determinant linked to TBI in the North American Indigenous populations. Two studies were focused on Canadian populations, with the remaining 8 studies focused on populations within the United States. Six social health determinants were identified within the studies, including: Rural location (Physical Environment) in seven studies, Male gender in five studies and Female gender in one study (in the setting of interpersonal violence) (Gender), Substance use in four studies and failure to utilize personal protective equipment in one study (Personal Health Practices and Coping Skills), Interpersonal Violence in one study (Social Environment), availability of rehabilitation services in one study (Health Services), and lack of family and friend presence during meetings with healthcare professionals in one study (Social Support Network). Conclusions: To date, little literature is available on the social determinants that impact TBI in the North American Indigenous population. Further research is warranted to better determine the incidence and social determinants associated.

Revue portant sur les déterminants sociaux du lésion cérébrale traumatique dans la population autochtone nord-américaine. Objectif: Compte tenu de la difficulté à circonscrire les déterminants sociaux se rapportant aux traumatismes cérébraux subis au sein des populations autochtones, nous souhaitons recenser toutes les études scientifiques qui portent sur ces déterminants, et ce, dans le cas des populations autochtones d’Amérique du Nord. Méthodes: Nous avons mené une recension systématique des écrits sur ce sujet. Pour ce faire, nous avons interrogé, du début de notre recherche à janvier 2016, les bases de données suivantes : MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, SCOPUS et Cochrane Library. Nous avons ensuite révisé nos résultats en deux étapes à l’aide de critères d’inclusion et d’exclusion prédéfinis. Au terme de notre travail, nous avons extrait et résumé les données contenues dans ces écrits. Résultats: Nous avons identifié dix études portant sur les déterminants sociaux liés aux traumatismes cérébraux subis au sein des populations autochtones d’Amérique du Nord. Deux d’entre elles se concentraient sur des populations canadiennes ; les huit autres, sur des populations américaines. Dans ces études, six déterminants sociaux de la santé ont émergé : l’implantation rurale (Milieu physique) dans le cas de sept études ; être de sexe masculin dans le cas de cinq études ou de sexe féminin dans le cas d’une seule étude, et ce, en lien avec la violence interpersonnelle (Sexe); la consommation de drogues dans le cas de quatre études et la non-utilisation d’équipement de protection individuelle dans le cas d’une étude (Pratiques personnelles en matière de santé et Capacité d’adaptation) ; la violence interpersonnelle dans le cas d’une étude (Milieu social) ; la disponibilité de services de réadaptation dans le cas d’une étude (Services de santé) ; et finalement, dans le cas d’une étude, le manque de présence de parents et d’amis lors de consultations avec des professionnels de la santé (Réseau de soutien social). Conclusions: Jusqu’à ce jour, il n’existe que peu d’études scientifiques au sujet des déterminants sociaux qui ont un impact sur les traumatismes cérébraux subis au sein des populations autochtones d’Amérique du Nord. De plus amples recherches s’imposent donc afin de mieux cerner l’incidence de ces déterminants.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Frederick A. Zeiler, Department of Surgery, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3A1R9. Email: umzeiler@myumanitoba.ca

References

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Social Determinants of Traumatic Brain Injury in the North American Indigenous Population: A Review

  • Kaitlin J. Zeiler (a1) and Frederick A. Zeiler (a2) (a3) (a4)

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