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Reflections on the History of the Canadian Association for Child Neurology

  • Henry G. Dunn (a1) and John A.R. Tibbles (a1)

Abstract

The Canadian Association for Child Neurology (CACN) was founded in June 1971 to combine neurologists interested in children and paediatricians interested in the nervous system into an organization which would promote the development of this subspecialty. Initially, the members of the Association mostly wished to have a training programme under the combined supervision of University Departments of Paediatrics and Neurology. However, under the influence of the Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada, and its Committee on Neurology, the training of child neurologists was organized in a manner analogous to that of neurologists for adults, though with an initial one or two years of paediatrics instead of medicine. By 1975, four years within a recognized neurological training programme could lead to the Certification Examination in Neurology, as modified for paediatric neurology. In 1981, the CACN also joined the Canadian Congress of Neurological Sciences. It has played an increasing part in child care and also in academic studies. However, evidence will be presented to show that the present number of paediatric neurologists in Canada is insufficient. The number of trainees also appears inadequate, and increased funding for training positions is needed. Close cooperation between paediatric neurologists, rehabilitation experts, developmental paediatricians and related subspecialists is required.

RÉSUMÉ:

L'Association canadienne de neurologie pédiatrique (ACNP) a été fondée en juin 1971 pour réunir les neurologues intéressés aux enfants et les pédiatres intéressés au système nerveux dans le but de promouvoir le développement de cette sous-spécialité. Initialement, les membres de l'Association désiraient surtout avoir un programme de formation sous la supervision conjointe de départements universitaires de pédiatrie et de neurologie. Cependant, sous l'influence du Collège royal des médecins et chirurgiens du Canada et de son Comité de neurologie, la formation des neurologues pour enfants a été organisée de la même façon que celle des neurologues pour adultes, avec une ou deux années de pédiatrie au lieu de médecine. En 1975, quatre ans d'entraînement dans un programme reconnu de neurologie pouvaient mener aux examens de certification en neurologie, modifiés pour la neurologie pédiatrique. En 1981, l'ACNP s'est également jointe au Congrès canadien des sciences neurologiques. Elle a joué un rôle de plus en plus grand dans le soin des enfants et dans la formation académique. Cependant, nous présenterons des données démontrant que le nombre actuel de neurologues pédiatriques au Canada est insuffisant. Le nombre des étudiants en formation semble aussi inadéquat et il faut augmenter les fonds destinés à l'entraînement. De plus, une coopération étroite doit exister entre les neurologues pédiatriques, les experts en réhabilitation, les pédiatres du développement et les sous-spécialités.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

A326B, BC's Children's Hospital, 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6H 3V4

References

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Reflections on the History of the Canadian Association for Child Neurology

  • Henry G. Dunn (a1) and John A.R. Tibbles (a1)

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