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The Impact of Aging on Vasa Nervorum, Nerve Blood Flow and Vasopressin Responsiveness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 September 2018

Mikihiro Kihara
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Kinki University, School of Medicine, Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka, Japan
Mitsuaki Shioyama
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Kinki University, School of Medicine, Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka, Japan
Kazuto Okuda
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Kinki University, School of Medicine, Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka, Japan
Mitsuo Takahashi
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Kinki University, School of Medicine, Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka, Japan
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Abstract:

Objective:

Aging impacts microvessels in a number of tissue beds. Vasopressin acts as a vasoconstrictor in most blood vessels but may also cause vasodilation. We evaluated the role of aging and vasopressin in the regulation of nerve blood flow (NBF) in rat peripheral nerve.

Methods:

We undertook a dose-response study to examine the impact of aging on resting NBF and its vasoreactivity to vasopressin. Nerve blood flow was measured using microelectrode hydrogen polarography. Argininevasopressin was administered both intra-arterially and topically.

Results:

In young adult rats (two months old) topical epineurial application of arginine-vasopressin produced a concentration-dependent reduction of NBF (ED50= 3.8 X 10-5 mol/L). Intra-arterial arginine-vasopressin also reduced NBF. Nerve blood flow was lower in aged rats (12 months old) and less responsive to topically applied vasopressin. The aging group had significantly higher concentrations of vasopressin in plasma than did the younger group.

Conclusions:

The results suggest that vasopressin constricts vessels in peripheral nerve and that there is an age related decline in the vasoconstrictive response to vasopressin. There may be a reduction in receptor sensitivity in vascular smooth muscle cells in peripheral nerve with increasing age.

Résumé:

Résumé: Objectif:

Le vieillissement affecte les microvaisseaux d’un certain nombre de lits tissulaires. La vasopressine agit comme vasoconstricteur dans la plupart des vaisseaux sanguins, mais elle peut également causer une vasodilatation. Nous avons évalué le rôle du vieillissement et de la vasopressine dans la régulation du flot sanguin nerveux (FSN) au niveau de nerfs périphériques de rats.

Méthode:

Nous avons effectué une étude doseréponse pour examiner l’impact du vieillissement sur le FSN au repos et sa vasoréactivité à la vasopressine. Le FSN a été mesuré par polarographie au moyen de microélectrodes à hydrogène. De l’arginine-vasopressine a été administrée par voie intra-artérielle et topique.

Résultats:

Chez de jeunes rats adultes (âgés de deux mois), l’application épineurale topique d’arginine-vasopressine a provoqué une réduction du FSN concentrationdépendante (ED50 = 3.8 X10-5 mol/L). L’administration intra-artérielle d’arginine-vasopressine a également réduit le FSN. Le flot sanguin nerveux était moindre chez les rats âgés (12 mois) et moins sensible à la vasopressine topique. Le groupe plus âgé avait des concentrations significativement plus élevées de vasopressine plasmatique que le groupe plus jeune.

Conclusions:

Ces résultats suggèrent que la vasopressine contracte les vaisseaux des nerfs périphériques et qu’il y a un déclin de la réponse vasoconstrictive à la vasopressine lié à l’âge. Il pourrait exister une diminution de la sensibilité du récepteur des cellules musculaires lisses des vaisseaux des nerfs périphériques avec l’âge.

Type
Experimental Neurosciences
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation 2002

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