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A Case of Adult Onset Tic Disorder Following Carbon Monoxide Intoxication

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2016

Sang-Bae Ko
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, BK-21, Seoul
Tae-Beom Ahn
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, BK-21, Seoul
Jong-Min Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, BK-21, Seoul
Yosik Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Korea
Beom S. Jeon
Affiliation:
Neuroscience Research Institute of SNUMRC, Seoul
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Abstract

Background:

Adult onset tic disorders are usually secondary in origin. We report a case of adult onset tic disorder following carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication with typical magnetic resonance imaging features.

Case Report:

A 36-year-old woman developed temporarily suppressible patterned movements on her face, neck, and shoulder associated with sensory discomfort after CO poisoning. Magnetic resonance images showed bilateral symmetric cavitary changes in the globus pallidus. Clonazepam relieved much of her symptoms.

Conclusion:

Our patient developed a mono-symptomatic tic disorder following CO intoxication. This further supports that altered outflow signals from the basal ganglia, especially the globus pallidus, may contribute to the development of tic disorders.

Type
Case Report
Copyright
Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological 2004

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