Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Bevacizumab in Recurrent Glioblastoma: Five Informative Patient Scenarios

  • Warren P. Mason (a1)

Abstract

Glioblastoma is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour in adults. Maximum feasible surgical resection, radiotherapy and temozolomide chemotherapy at initial diagnosis have improved prognosis but rapid recurrence is typical and survival remains brief. There is an urgent need for effective new treatments and approval of the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab for recurrent glioblastoma by Health Canada in 2009 has been the most notable recent therapeutic advance for this disease. This review with illustrative case studies highlights how bevacizumab has been incorporated into the treatment of glioblastoma in Canada and describes the ongoing controversies surrounding its clinical application.

Le bévacizumab dans le traitement de la récidive du glioblastome : cinq scenarios informatifs. Le glioblastome est la tumeur primitive du cerveau qui est la plus maligne et la plus fréquente chez les adultes. La résection chirurgicale maximale réalisable, la radiothérapie et la chimiothérapie au moyen du témozolomide au moment du diagnostic initial en ont amélioré le pronostic, mais une récidive rapide est typique et la survie demeure brève. Il est urgent de développer de nouveaux traitements efficaces. L’approbation par Santé Canada en 2009 de l’agent antiangiogénique bévacizumab pour traiter la récidive du glioblastome a été le traitement innovateur le plus notable pour cette maladie. Cette revue souligne comment le bévacizumab a été incorporé au traitement du glioblastome au Canada, avec des études de cas à l’appui, et décrit les controverses qui ont cours concernant son utilisation en clinique.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Bevacizumab in Recurrent Glioblastoma: Five Informative Patient Scenarios
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Bevacizumab in Recurrent Glioblastoma: Five Informative Patient Scenarios
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Bevacizumab in Recurrent Glioblastoma: Five Informative Patient Scenarios
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Warren P. Mason, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Suite 18-717, Toronto, ON, M5G 2M9, Canada. Email: Warren.mason@uhn.ca

References

Hide All
1. CBTRUS Statistical Report: Primary Brain and Central Nervous System Tumours Diagnosed in the United States in 2005-2009. Neuro-Oncology. 2012;14(Supplement 5):v1-v49.
2. Stupp, R, Mason, WP, van den Bent, MJ, et al. Radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide for glioblastoma. New Engl J Med. 2005;352:987-996.
3. Lwin, Z, MacFadden, D, Al-Zahrani, A, et al. Glioblastoma management in the temozolomide era: have we improved outcome? J Neurooncol. 2013;115:303-310.
4. Hegi, ME, Diserens, AC, Gorlia, T, et al. MGMT gene silencing and benefit from temozolomide in glioblastoma. New Engl J Med. 2005;352:997-1003.
5. Stupp, R, Hegi, ME, Mason, WP, et al. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial. Lancet Oncology. 2009;10:459-466.
6. Wong, ET, Hess, KR, Gleason, MJ, et al. Outcomes and prognostic factors in recurrent glioma patients enrolled onto phase II clinical trials. J Clin Oncol. 1999;17:2572-2578.
7. Ballman, KV, Buckner, JC, Brown, PD, et al. The relationship between six-month progression-free survival and 12-month overall survival end points for phase II trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Neuro-Oncology. 2007;9:29-38.
8. Beal, K, Abrey, LE, Gutin, PH. Antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of recurrent or newly diagnosed glioblastoma: Analysis of single-agent and combined modality approaches. Radiat Oncol. 2011;6:2-15.
9. McNamara, MG, Mason, WP. Antiangiogenic therapies in glioblastoma multiforme. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther. 2012;12:643-654.
10. Cohen, MH, Shen, YL, Keegan, P, Pazdur, R. FDA drug approval summary: bevacizumab (Avastin) as treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. Oncologist. 2009;14:1131-1138.
11. Friedman, HS, Prados, MD, Wen, PY, et al. Bevacizumab alone and in combination with irinotecan in recurrent glioblastoma. J Clin Oncol. 2009;27:4733-4740.
12. Kreisl, TN, Kim, L, Moore, K, et al. Phase II trial of single-agent bevacizumab followed by bevacizumab plus irinotecan at tumor progression in recurrent glioblastoma. J Clin Oncol. 2009;27:740-745.
13. Wefel, JS, Cloughesy, T, Zazzali, JL, et al. Neurocognitive function in patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab. Neuro-Oncology. 2011;13:660-668.
14. Vredenburgh, JJ, Cloughesy, T, Samant, M, et al. Corticosteroid use in patients with glioblastoma at first or second relapse treated with bevacizumab in the BRAIN study. Oncologist. 2010;15:1329-1334.
15. Johnson, DR, Leeper, HE, Uhm, JH. Glioblastoma survival in the United States improved after Food and Drug Administration approval of bevacizumab: a population-based analysis. Cancer. 2013;119:3489-3495.
16. Galanis, E, Anderson, SK, Lafky, JM, et al. Phase II study of bevacizumab in combination with sorafenib in recurrent glioblastoma (N0776): a north central cancer treatment group trial. Clin Cancer Res. 2013;19:4816-4823.
17. Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Peters, K, et al. Phase II study of metronomic chemotherapy with bevacizumab for recurrent glioblastoma after progression on bevacizumab therapy. J Neurooncol. 2011;103:371-379.
18. Lassen, U, Sorensen, M, Gaziel, TB, Hasselbalch, B, Poulsen, HS. Phase II study of bevacizumab and temsirolimus combination therapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. Anticancer Res. 2013;33:1657-1660.
19. Field, KM, Simes, J, Wheeler, H, et al. A randomized phase II study of carboplatin and bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (CABARET). J Clin Oncol. 2013;31 (suppl; abstract 2017).
20. Taal, W, Oosterkamp, HM, Walenkamp, AME, et al. A randomized phase II study of bevacizumab versus bevacizumab plus lomustine versus lomustine single agent in recurrent glioblastoma: The Dutch BELOB study. J Clin Oncol. 2013;31 (suppl; abstract 2001).
21. Wen, PY, Macdonald, DR, Reardon, DA, et al. Updated response assessment criteria for high-grade gliomas: response assessment in neuro-oncology working group. J Clin Oncol. 2010;28:1963-1972.
22. Prados, M, Cloughesy, T, Samant, M, et al. Response as a predictor of survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab. Neuro-Oncology. 2011;13:143-151.
23. Iwamoto, FM, Abrey, LE, Beal, K, et al. Patterns of relapse and prognosis after bevacizumab failure in recurrent glioblastoma. Neurology. 2009;73:1200-1206.
24. Wen, PY, Junck, L. Bevacizumab for glioblastoma: what can we learn from patterns of progression? Neurology. 2014;82:1670-1671.
25. Pope, WB, Xia, Q, Paton, VE, et al. Patterns of progression in patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab. Neurology. 2011;76:432-437.
26. Wick, W, Chinot, OL, Mason, WP, et al. Patterns of tumour progression in a phase 3 study of bevacizumab (Bv) plus radiotherapy (RT) plus temozolomide (T) for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GB). J Clin Oncol. 2014;32 (No. 15_suppl; abstract 2051).
27. Kesselheim, JC, Norden, AD, Wen, PY, Joffe, S. Discontinuing bevacizumab in patients with glioblastoma: an ethical analysis. Oncologist. 2011;16:1435-1439.
28. Reardon, DA, Herndon, JE 2nd, Peters, KB, et al. Bevacizumab continuation beyond initial bevacizumab progression among recurrent glioblastoma patients. Brit J Cancer. 2012;107:1481-1487.
29. Brandes, AA, Mason, W, Pichler, J, et al. Clinical trial protocol: Can bevacizumab prolong survival for glioblastoma patients through multiple lines of therapy? Future Oncol. 2014;10:1137-1145.
30. Piccioni, DE, Selfridge, J, Mody, RR, et al. Deferred use of bevacizumab for recurrent glioblastoma is not associated with diminished efficacy. Neuro-Oncology. 2014;16:815-822.
31. Chinot, OL, Wick, W, Mason, W, et al. Bevacizumab plus radiotherapy-temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. New Engl J Med. 2014;370:709-722.
32. Gilbert, MR, Dignam, JJ, Armstrong, TS, et al. A randomized trial of bevacizumab for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. New Engl J Med. 2014;370:699-708.
33. Phillips, H, Sandmann, T, Li, C, et al. Correlation of molecular subtypes with survival in AVAglio (bevacizumab [Bv] and radiotherapy [RT] and temozolomide [T] for newly diagnosed glioblastoma [GB}. J Clin Oncol. 2014;32 (No. 15_suppl; abstract 2001).
34. Green, RM, Woyshner, EA, Nghiemphu, L, Lai, A, Cloughesy, T. Use of bevacizumab to facilitate up-front chemoradiation in poor-risk patients with glioblastoma multiforme by improving neurologic function. J Clin Oncol. 2010;20 (No. 15_suppl; abstract 2059).
35. Herrlinger, U, Schaefer, N, Steinbach, JP, et al. Bevacizumab, irinotecan, and radiotherapy versus standard temozolomide and radiotherapy in newly diagnosed, MGMT-nonmethylated glioblastoma patients: First results from the randomized multicenter GLARIUS trial. J Clin Oncol. 2013;31 (suppl; abstract LBA2000).
36. Fine, HA. Bevacizumab in glioblastoma--still much to learn. New Engl J Med. 2014;370:764-765.

Keywords

Bevacizumab in Recurrent Glioblastoma: Five Informative Patient Scenarios

  • Warren P. Mason (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed