Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Academic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Acute Care Consultations

  • Shannon L. MacDonald (a1) and Lawrence R. Robinson (a1) (a2)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to describe the provision of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation acute care consultations in the United States and Canada. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation department chairs/division directors at academic centers in Canada and the United States were mailed an 18-item questionnaire. Seven of 13 (54%) Canadian and 26/78 (33%) American surveys were returned. A majority of Canadian and American academic institutions provide acute care consultations; however, there were some national differences. American institutions see larger volumes of patients, and more American respondents indicated using a dedicated acute care consultation service model compared with Canadians.

Consultations en physiatrie offertes par des établissements universitaires en lien avec des soins de courte durée. L’objectif de la présente étude est de décrire l’offre de consultations en physiatrie aux États-Unis et au Canada en lien avec des soins de courte durée. Pour ce faire, tant des directeurs de départements en physiatrie que des responsables de programmes de centres de recherche ont reçu par la poste un questionnaire en 18 points. En ce qui regarde les questionnaires destinés à des Canadiens, 7 sur 13 ont été retournés, soit 54 % ; du côté des répondants américains, 26 sur 78 l’ont été, soit 33 %. Si une majorité d’établissements universitaires du Canada et des États-Unis offrent des consultations en lien avec des soins de courte durée, des différences entre ces deux pays ont été notées. À cet égard, les établissements américains tendent à prendre en charge un plus grand nombre de patients ; en outre, plus de répondants des États-Unis ont indiqué, si on les compare à ceux du Canada, avoir utilisé un modèle de service s’appliquant spécifiquement à des consultations liées à des soins de courte durée.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Academic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Acute Care Consultations
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Academic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Acute Care Consultations
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Academic Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Acute Care Consultations
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Lawrence R. Robinson, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, St. John’s Rehab, 285 Cummer Avenue, Room S125, Toronto, ON, Canada, M2M 2G1. Email: Larry.Robinson@sunnybrook.ca

Footnotes

Hide All

Preliminary data were submitted as an abstract and presented as a podium presentation at the Canadian Association of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation annual scientific meeting in May 2017 in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada. Abstracts presented at CAPM&R are submitted to the Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine for publication.

Footnotes

References

Hide All
1. Tam, AK, Berbrayer, D, Robinson, LR. What should be the role of physiatrists in early acute care rehabilitation?: Current literature, models of care, and thoughts for the future. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2016;95(3):225-229.
2. Greiss, C, Yonclas, PP, Jasey, N, et al. Presence of a dedicated trauma center physiatrist improves functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2016;80(1):70-75.
3. Wagner, AK, Fabio, T, Zafonte, RD, Goldberg, G, Marion, DW, Peitzman, AB. Physical medicine and rehabilitation consultation: relationships with acute functional outcome, length of stay, and discharge planning after traumatic brain injury. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2003;82(7):526-536.
4. Taheri, PA, Iteld, LH, Michaels, AJ, Edelstein, S, Di Ponio, L, Rodriguez, JL. Physician resource utilization after geriatric trauma. J Trauma. 1997;43(4):565-568; discussion 8-9.
5. Melchiorre, PJ. Status of physiatry and physical medicine and rehabilitation departments in adult level I trauma centers. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998;79(1):62-66.
6. Musick, D, Nickerson, R, McDowell, S, Gater, D. An exploratory examination of an academic PM&R inpatient consultation service. Disabil Rehabil. 2003;25(7):354-359.
7. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). ACGME program requirements for graduate medical education in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Chicago, IL: ACGME; 2016.
8. Committee on Trauma, American College of Surgeons. Resources for optimal care of the injured patient. Chicago, IL: American College of Surgeons; 2014.
9. Abdulaziz, K, Brehaut, J, Taljaard, M, et al. National survey of physicians to determine the effect of unconditional incentives on response rates of physician postal surveys. BMJ Open. 2015;5:e007166.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed