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Where does our protein carbon come from?

  • Robert Hedges (a1)
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References

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Frayn, KNMetabolic Regulation, a Human Perspective. OxfordBlackwell Science 2003
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Jim, S, Jones, V, Ambrose, SH & Evershed, RPQuantifying dietary macronutrient sources of carbon for bone collagen biosynthesis using natural abundance stable carbon isotope analysis. Br J Nutr 2006 95 10551062
Koch, PLIsotopic reconstructions of past continental environments. Annu Rev Earth Planet Sci 1998 26 573613
Lambert, JB, Weydert, JM, Williams, SR & Buikstra, JEComparison of methods for the removal of diagenetic material in buried bone. J Arch Sci 1990 17 453468
Pearsall, D & Piperno, PR. Antiquity of maize cultivation in Ecuador: summary and reevaluation of the evidence. Am Antiquity 1990 55 324337
Richards, MP, Schulting, RJ & Hedges, REMSharp shift in diet at onset of Neolithic. Nature 2003 425 366
Schwarcz, HP & Schoeninger, MJStable isotopic analyses in human nutritional ecology. Yearb Phys Anthropol 1991 34 283321
Van der Merwe, NJ & Vogel, JC13C content of human collagen as a measure of prehistoric diet in woodland North America. Nature 1978 815816
Wu, GIntestinal mucosal amino acid catabolism. J Nutr 1998 128 12491252

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