Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Sociodemographic factors associated with dietary supplement use in early pregnancy in a Swedish cohort

  • Linnea Bärebring (a1), Deirdre Mullally (a1), Anna Glantz (a2), Joy Elllis (a3), Lena Hulthén (a1), Åse Jagner (a2), Maria Bullarbo (a4) (a5), Anna Winkvist (a1) and Hanna Augustin (a1)...

Abstract

Sociodemographic factors have been associated with dietary supplement use among pregnant women but few data exist in a Swedish population. This study aimed to identify factors associated with overall supplement use as well as use of folic acid, vitamin D and n-3 in early pregnancy. Women in the first trimester of pregnancy were included at registration to the antenatal care in 2013–2014 (n 2109). Information regarding supplement use as well as sociodemographic and anthropometric data were obtained from questionnaires and medical records. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship between sociodemographic variables and supplement use. A total of 78 % of the participants reported using at least one dietary supplement in the first trimester. Folic acid supplement use was reported by 74 %, vitamin D supplement use by 43 % and n-3 supplement use by <5 %. Use of any type of supplement in early pregnancy was related to gestational age, parity, birthplace, education and employment. Folic acid supplement use was related to gestational age, parity, birthplace, income, education and employment. Vitamin D supplement use was related to gestational age, birthplace and education. In conclusion, in the first trimester of pregnancy, folic acid supplements were used by three in four women, while vitamin D supplements were used by less than half of the women. The results of this study show a socioeconomic disparity between supplement users and non-users which may have a negative impact on the health of future generations.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Sociodemographic factors associated with dietary supplement use in early pregnancy in a Swedish cohort
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Sociodemographic factors associated with dietary supplement use in early pregnancy in a Swedish cohort
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Sociodemographic factors associated with dietary supplement use in early pregnancy in a Swedish cohort
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: L. Bärebring, email linnea.barebring@gu.se

References

Hide All
1. Barker, DJ (1990) The fetal and infant origins of adult disease. BMJ 301, 1111.
2. Amcoff, E, Edberg, A, Enghardt Barbieri, H, et al. (2010-11) Riksmaten – vuxna 2010–11. Livsmedels- och näringsintag bland vuxna i Sverige. Uppsala: National Food Agency.
3. Becker, W, Lindroos, AK, Nälsén, C, et al. (2016) Dietary habits, nutrient intake and biomarkers for folate, vitamin D, iodine and iron status among women of childbearing age in Sweden. Ups J Med Sci 121, 271275.
4. Lundqvist, A, Johansson, I, Wennberg, AL, et al. (2014) Reported dietary intake in early pregnant compared to non-pregnant women – a cross-sectional study. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 14, 373.
5. Medical Research Council Vitamin Study Research Group (1991) Prevention of neural tube defects: results of the Medical Research Council Vitamin Study. Lancet 338, 131137.
6. Thorne-Lyman, A & Fawzi, WW (2012) Vitamin D during pregnancy and maternal, neonatal and infant health outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 26, 7590.
7. Larqué, E, Gil-Sánchez, A, Prieto-Sánchez, MT, et al. (2012) Omega 3 fatty acids, gestation and pregnancy outcomes. Br J Nutr 107, S77S84.
8. The National Food Agency (2008) Advice About Food for You Who Are Pregnant. Uppsala: National Food Agency.
9. Aronsson, CA, Vehik, K, Yang, J, et al. (2013) Use of dietary supplements in pregnant women in relation to sociodemographic factors – a report from the Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study. Public Health Nutr 16, 13901402.
10. Oliver, EM, Grimshaw, KEC, Schoemaker, AA, et al. (2014) Dietary habits and supplement use in relation to national pregnancy recommendations: data from the EuroPrevall Birth Cohort. Matern Child Health J 18, 24082425.
11. Cueto, HT, Riis, AH, Hatch, EE, et al. (2012) Predictors of preconceptional folic acid or multivitamin supplement use: a cross-sectional study of Danish pregnancy planners. Clin Epidemiol 4, 259265.
12. McKeating, A, Farren, M, Cawley, S, et al. (2015) Maternal folic acid supplementation trends 2009–2013. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 94, 727733.
13. Manniën, J, De Jonge, A, Cornel, MC, et al. (2013) Factors associated with not using folic acid supplements preconceptionally. Public Health Nutr 17, 23442350.
14. Haugen, M, Brantsæter, AL, Alexander, J, et al. (2008) Dietary supplements contribute substantially to the total nutrient intake in pregnant Norwegian women. Ann Nutr Metab 52, 272280.
15. Bärebring, L, Bullarbo, M, Glantz, A, et al. (2016) Preeclampsia and blood pressure trajectory during pregnancy in relation to vitamin D status. PLOS ONE 11, e0152198.
16. Bärebring, L, Schoenmakers, I, Glantz, A, et al. (2016) Vitamin D status during pregnancy in a multi-ethnic population-representative Swedish cohort. Nutrients 8, 655.
17. Socialstyrelsen (2015) Pregnancies, Deliveries and Newborn Infants: The Swedish Medical Birth Register 1973–2014, no. 1400-3511]. Stockholm: Official Statistics of Sweden.
19. Statistics Sweden (2014) Inkomst av tjänst (antal personer, medelvärden och totalsumma) efter region, kön, ålder och inkomstklass. År 2000–2014 (Income by region, gender, age and income class. Years 2000–2014). http://www.statistikdatabasen.scb.se/pxweb/sv/ssd/START__HE__HE0110__HE0110A/InkAvTjanst/?rxid=fd771a78-3d45-4624-b631-0e0142f385ce (accessed February 2016).
20. Arkkola, T, Uusitalo, U, Pietikäinen, M, et al. (2006) Dietary intake and use of dietary supplements in relation to demographic variables among pregnant Finnish women. Br J Nutr 96, 913920.
21. Brekke, HK & Ludvigsson, J (2007) Vitamin D supplementation and diabetes-related autoimmunity in the ABIS study. Pediatr Diabetes 8, 1114.
22. Nagata, JM, Gatti, LR & Barg, FK (2012) Social determinants of iron supplementation among women of reproductive age: a systematic review of qualitative data. Matern Child Nutr 8, 118.
23. Tort, J, Lelong, N, Prunet, C, et al. (2013) Maternal and health care determinants of preconceptional use of folic acid supplementation in France: results from the 2010 National Perinatal Survey. BJOG 120, 16611667.
24. Taguma, M, Kim, M, Brink, S, et al. (2010) OECD Reviews of Migrant Education – Sweden. Paris: OECD.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed