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Significant inverse associations of serum n-6 fatty acids with plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1

  • Sunghee Lee (a1), J. David Curb (a2) (a3) (a4), Takashi Kadowaki (a2), Rhobert W. Evans (a1), Katsuyuki Miura (a2), Tomoko Takamiya (a1), Chol Shin (a5), Aiman El-Saed (a1), Jina Choo (a6), Akira Fujiyoshi (a2), Teruo Otake (a1), Sayaka Kadowaki (a2), Todd Seto (a3), Kamal Masaki (a3), Daniel Edmundowicz (a7), Hirotsugu Ueshima (a2), Lewis H. Kuller (a1) and Akira Sekikawa (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

Epidemiological studies suggested that n-6 fatty acids, especially linoleic acid (LA), have beneficial effects on CHD, whereas some in vitro studies have suggested that n-6 fatty acids, specifically arachidonic acid (AA), may have harmful effects. We examined the association of serum n-6 fatty acids with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). A population-based cross-sectional study recruited 926 randomly selected men aged 40–49 years without CVD during 2002–2006 (310 Caucasian, 313 Japanese and 303 Japanese-American men). Plasma PAI-1 was analysed in free form, both active and latent. Serum fatty acids were measured with gas-capillary liquid chromatography. To examine the association between total n-6 fatty acids (including LA and AA) and PAI-1, multivariate regression models were used. After adjusting for confounders, total n-6 fatty acids, LA and AA, were inversely and significantly associated with PAI-1 levels. These associations were consistent across three populations. Among 915 middle-aged men, serum n-6 fatty acids had significant inverse associations with PAI-1.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr A. Sekikawa, fax +1 412 383 1956, email akira@pitt.edu

References

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Significant inverse associations of serum n-6 fatty acids with plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1

  • Sunghee Lee (a1), J. David Curb (a2) (a3) (a4), Takashi Kadowaki (a2), Rhobert W. Evans (a1), Katsuyuki Miura (a2), Tomoko Takamiya (a1), Chol Shin (a5), Aiman El-Saed (a1), Jina Choo (a6), Akira Fujiyoshi (a2), Teruo Otake (a1), Sayaka Kadowaki (a2), Todd Seto (a3), Kamal Masaki (a3), Daniel Edmundowicz (a7), Hirotsugu Ueshima (a2), Lewis H. Kuller (a1) and Akira Sekikawa (a1) (a2)...

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