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Should urinary iodine concentrations of school-aged children continue to be used as proxy for different populations? Analysis of data from Chinese national surveys

  • Peng Liu (a1), Xiaohui Su (a1), Mu Li (a2), Hongmei Shen (a1), Jun Yu (a1), Patrick J. Kelly (a2), Fangang Meng (a1), Lixiang Liu (a1), Lijun Fan (a1), Ming Li (a1), Shoujun Liu (a1) and Dianjun Sun (a1)...

Abstract

I deficiency is a worldwide public health problem. Median urinary I concentration in school-aged children has been used globally as a proxy for all populations. This study aims to determine whether median urinary I concentration of school-aged children is an appropriate indicator of I nutritional status in different adult populations. This is a secondary data analysis of two national I Deficiency Disorder surveys (2011, 2014) and two regional surveys (in coastal areas, 2009, and in high-risk areas, 2009–2014). Population groups included in these surveys were school-aged children (8–10 years), pregnant women, lactating women, women of childbearing age and adults (men and women, 18–45 years). All participants were self-reported healthy without history of thyroid diseases or were not using thyroid medicines. The median urinary I concentration of school-aged children was matched with that of the other population at the county level. The matched populations had similar iodised salt supply, food and water I, food composition and I content in salt. Weak or moderate correlation of median urinary I concentrations was observed between school-aged children and pregnant women and between children and lactating women. However, the agreement was stronger between children and women of childbearing age and between children and adult men and women. The results could be affected by cut-off values, data aggregation level and sample size. Using median urinary I concentration of school-aged children tends to overestimate that of pregnant women and lactating women. Median urinary I concentration of school-aged children can be used for assessing I nutrition in the adult population.

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Corresponding author

* Corresponding authors: S. Liu, fax +86 451 8667 5814, email liusj590406@163.com; D. Sun, fax +86 451 8665 7674, email hrbmusdj@163.com

Footnotes

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Present address: Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, No. 157 Baojian Road, Nangang District, Harbin, 150081, People’s Republic of China.

Footnotes

References

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Should urinary iodine concentrations of school-aged children continue to be used as proxy for different populations? Analysis of data from Chinese national surveys

  • Peng Liu (a1), Xiaohui Su (a1), Mu Li (a2), Hongmei Shen (a1), Jun Yu (a1), Patrick J. Kelly (a2), Fangang Meng (a1), Lixiang Liu (a1), Lijun Fan (a1), Ming Li (a1), Shoujun Liu (a1) and Dianjun Sun (a1)...

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