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Protective effect of β-(1,3 → 1,6)-d-glucan against irritant-induced gastric lesions

  • Ken-ichiro Tanaka (a1), Yuta Tanaka (a1), Toshio Suzuki (a2) and Tohru Mizushima (a1)

Abstract

β-(1,3)-d-Glucan with β-(1,6) branches has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-tumour and anti-infection activities, which result from its immunomodulating effects. Gastric lesions result from an imbalance between aggressive and defensive factors. In the present study, we examined the effect of β-(1,3)-d-glucan with β-(1,6) branches isolated from Aureobasidium pullulans on the gastric ulcerogenic response in mice. Oral administration of β-glucan ameliorated gastric lesions induced by ethanol (EtOH) or HCl. This administration of β-glucan also suppressed EtOH-induced inflammatory responses, such as infiltration of neutrophils and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and cell adhesion molecules (CAM) at the gastric mucosa. Of the various defensive factors, the levels of heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and mucin but not PGE2 were increased by the administration of β-glucan. β-Glucan-dependent induction of the expression of HSP70 and mucin proteins and suppression of the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and CAM were also observed in cultured cells in vitro. The results of the present study suggest that β-glucan protects the gastric mucosa from the formation of irritant-induced lesions by increasing the levels of defensive factors, such as HSP70 and mucin.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr T. Mizushima, email mizu@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

References

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Keywords

Protective effect of β-(1,3 → 1,6)-d-glucan against irritant-induced gastric lesions

  • Ken-ichiro Tanaka (a1), Yuta Tanaka (a1), Toshio Suzuki (a2) and Tohru Mizushima (a1)

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