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Prevalence of inadequate micronutrient intakes of Canadian long-term care residents

  • Heather H. Keller (a1) (a2), Christina Lengyel (a3), Natalie Carrier (a4), Susan E. Slaughter (a5), Jill Morrison (a2), Alison M. Duncan (a6), Catriona M. Steele (a7) (a8), Lisa Duizer (a9), K. Stephen Brown (a10), Habib Chaudhury (a11), Minn N. Yoon (a12), Veronique Boscart (a1) (a13), George Heckman (a1) and Lita Villalon (a4)...

Abstract

This study determines the prevalence of inadequate micronutrient intakes consumed by long-term care (LTC) residents. This cross-sectional study was completed in thirty-two LTC homes in four Canadian provinces. Weighed and estimated food and beverage intake were collected over 3 non-consecutive days from 632 randomly selected residents. Nutrient intakes were adjusted for intra-individual variation and compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes. Proportion of participants, stratified by sex and use of modified (MTF) or regular texture foods, with intakes below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) or Adequate Intake (AI), were identified. Numbers of participants that met these adequacy values with use of micronutrient supplements was determined. Mean age of males (n 197) was 85·2 (sd 7·6) years and females (n 435) was 87·4 (sd 7·8) years. In all, 33 % consumed MTF; 78·2 % (males) and 76·1 % (females) took at least one micronutrient pill. Participants on a MTF had lower intake for some nutrients (males=4; females=8), but also consumed a few nutrients in larger amounts than regular texture consumers (males=4; females =1). More than 50 % of participants in both sexes and texture groups consumed inadequate amounts of folate, vitamins B6, Ca, Mg and Zn (males only), with >90 % consuming amounts below the EAR/AI for vitamin D, E, K, Mg (males only) and K. Vitamin D supplements resolved inadequate intakes for 50–70 % of participants. High proportions of LTC residents have intakes for nine of twenty nutrients examined below the EAR or AI. Strategies to improve intake specific to these nutrients are needed.

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Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: H. H. Keller, email hkeller@uwaterloo.ca

References

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