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Olive oil phenolics: effects on DNA-oxidation and redox enzyme mRNA in prostate cells

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Elizabeth Lund
Affiliation:
Institute of Food ResearchNorwich Research ParkColneyNorwich NR4 7UAUK
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Abstract

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Type
Invited commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2002

References

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