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n-3 Fatty acid metabolism in women – Reply

  • Graham Burdge (a1)
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Abstract

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References

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Burdge, GC, Jones, AE & Wootton, SA (2002) Eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic acids are the principal products of α-linolenic acid metabolism in young men. Br J Nutr 88, 355363.
Burdge, GC & Wootton, SA (2002) Conversion of α-linolenic acid to eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in young women. Br J Nutr 88, 411420.
Burdge, GC & Wootton, SA (2003) Conversion of α-linolenic acid to palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic acids in men and women. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 69, 283290.
Jones, AE, Murphy, JL, Stolinski, M & Wootton, SA (1998) The effect of age and gender on the metabolic disposal of 1-13C palmitic acid. Eur J Clin Nutr 52, 2228.
Ottosson, UB, Lagrelius, A, Rosing, U & von Schoultz, B (1984) Relative fatty acid composition of lecithin during postmenopausal replacement therapy—a comparison between ethinyl estradiol and estradiol valerate. Gynecol Obstet Invest 18, 296302.
Pawlosky, R, Hibbeln, J, Lin, Y & Salem, N Jr (2003 a) n-3 Fatty acid metabolism in women. Br J Nutr 90, 993994.
Pawlosky, RJ, Hibbeln, JR, Lin, Y, et al. (2003 b) Effects of beef- and fish-based diets on the kinetics of n-3 fatty acid metabolism in human subjects. Am J Clin Nutr 77, 565572.
Postle, AD, Al, MDM, Burdge, GC & Hornstra, G (1995) The composition of individual molecular species of plasma phosphatidylcholine in human pregnancy. Early Hum Dev 43, 4758.

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