Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Metabolism and performance during extended high-intensity intermittent exercise after consumption of low- and high-glycaemic index pre-exercise meals

  • Christine B. Bennett (a1), Philip D. Chilibeck (a2), Trevor Barss (a2), Hassanali Vatanparast (a2), Albert Vandenberg (a3) and Gordon A. Zello (a1)...

Abstract

The metabolic and performance benefits of prior consumption of low-glycaemic index (GI) meals v. high-GI meals were determined in extended high-intensity intermittent exercise. Participants (ten males and four females, aged 25·8 (sd 7·3) years) completed two testing days (each consisting of back-to-back 90-min intermittent high-intensity treadmill running protocols separated by 3 h) spaced by at least 7 d. Using a randomised counterbalanced cross-over design, low-GI, lentil-based meals (GI about 42) or high-GI, potato-based meals (GI about 78) matched for energy value were consumed 2 h before, and within 1 h after, the first exercise session. Performance was measured by the distance covered during five 1-min sprints (separated by 2·5 min walking) at the end of each exercise session. Peak postprandial blood glucose was higher by 30·8 % in the high-GI trial compared with the low-GI trial, as was insulin (P = 0·039 and P = 0·003, respectively). Carbohydrate oxidation was lower by 5·5 % during the low-GI trials compared with the high-GI trials at the start of the first exercise session (P < 0·05). Blood lactate was significantly higher (6·1 v. 2·6 mmol/l; P = 0·019) and blood glucose significantly lower (4·8 v. 5·4 mmol/l; P = 0·039) at the end of the second exercise session during the high-GI trial compared with the low-GI trial. Sprint distance was not significantly different between conditions. A low-GI meal improved the metabolic profile before and during extended high-intensity intermittent exercise, but did not affect performance. Improvements in metabolic responses when consuming low-GI meals before exercise may be beneficial to the long-term health of athletes.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Metabolism and performance during extended high-intensity intermittent exercise after consumption of low- and high-glycaemic index pre-exercise meals
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Metabolism and performance during extended high-intensity intermittent exercise after consumption of low- and high-glycaemic index pre-exercise meals
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Metabolism and performance during extended high-intensity intermittent exercise after consumption of low- and high-glycaemic index pre-exercise meals
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr Gordon Zello, fax +1 306 966 6377, email gordon.zello@usask.ca

References

Hide All
1Thomas, D, Brotherhood, J & Brand, J (1991) Carbohydrate feeding before exercise: effect of glycemic index. Int J Sports Med 12, 180186.
2Febbraio, M & Stewart, K (1996) CHO feeding before prolonged exercise: effect of glycemic index on muscle glycogenolysis and exercise performance. J Appl Physiol 8, 11151120.
3Wee, S, Williams, C, Gray, S, et al. (1999) Influence of high and low glycemic index meals on endurance running capacity. Med Sci Sports Exerc 31, 393399.
4Stevenson, E, Williams, C, McComb, G, et al. (2005) Improved recovery from prolonged exercise following the consumption of low glycemic index carbohydrate meals. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 15, 333349.
5Wong, H, Siu, P, Lok, A, et al. (2008) Effect of glycaemic index of pre-exercise carbohydrate meals on running performance. Eur J Sport Sci 8, 2333.
6Chen, YJ, Wong, SH, Wong, CK, et al. (2008) Effect of preexercise meals with different glycemic indices and loads on metabolic responses and endurance running. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 18, 281300.
7Little, JP, Chilibeck, PD, Ciona, D, et al. (2009) The effect of low- and high-glycemic index foods on high-intensity intermittent exercise. Int J Sports Physiol Perform 4, 367380.
8Erith, S, Williams, C, Stevenson, E, et al. (2006) The effect of high carbohydrate meals with different glycemic indices on recovery of performance during prolonged intermittent high-intensity shuttle running. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 16, 393404.
9Little, JP, Chilibeck, PD, Ciona, D, et al. (2010) Effect of low and high glycemic index meals on metabolism and performance during high-intensity, intermittent exercise. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 20, 447456.
10Little, JP, Chilibeck, PD, Bennett, CB, et al. (2009) Food for endurance – the evidence, with a focus on glycaemic index. In CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources 4, no. 058, pp. 113. Wallingford: CAB International.
11Moore, L, Midgley, A, Thurlow, S, et al. (2010) Effect of glycaemic index of a pre-exercise meal on metabolism and cycling time trial performance. J Sci Med Sport 13, 182188.
12Reilly, T (1997) Energetics of high-intensity exercise (soccer) with particular reference to fatigue. J Sport Sci 15, 257263.
13Romijn, JA, Coyle, E, Sidossis, LS, et al. (1993) Regulation of endogenous fat and carbohydrate metabolism in relation to exercise intensity and duration. Am J Physiol 265, E380E391.
14Thomas, S, Reading, J & Shephard, RJ (1992) Revision of the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q). Can J Sport Sci 17, 338345.
15Harling, S, Tong, R & Mickleborough, T (2003) The oxygen uptake response running to exhaustion at peak treadmill speed. Med Sci Sports Exerc 35, 663668.
16American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada and American College of Sports Medicine (2009) Nutrition and athlete performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc 41, 709731.
17Jenkins, D, Thomas, D, Wolever, R, et al. (1981) Glycemic index of foods: a physiological basis for carbohydrate exchange. Am J Clin Nutr 34, 362366.
18Wolever, MS & Jenkins, DJ (1986) The use of the glycemic index in predicting the blood glucose response to mixed meals. Am J Clin Nutr 43, 167172.
19Foster-Powell, K, Holt, S & Brand-Miller, J (2002) International table of glycemic index and glycemic load values. Am J Clin Nutr 76, 556.
20Wolever, MS, Jenkins, DJ, Jenkins, AL, et al. (1991) The glycemic index: methodology and clinical implications. Am J Clin Nutr 54, 846854.
21Health Canada (2007) Canadian Nutrient File 2007b version. Ottawa: Health Canada.
22United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Services (2008) National nutrient database for standard reference. www.ndb.nal.usda.gov.
23Drust, B, Reilly, T & Cable, NT (2000) Physiological responses to laboratory-based soccer-specific intermittent and continuous exercise. J Sports Sci 18, 885892.
24Borg, G (1977) Simple ratings method for estimation of perceived exertion. In Physical Work and Effort, pp. 3947 [Borg, G, editor]. Oxford: Pergamon Press.
25Jeukendrup, A & Wallis, G (2005) Measurement of substrate oxidation during exercise by means of gas exchange measurements. Int J Sport Med 26, S28S37.
26DeMarco, H, Sucher, K, Cisar, C, et al. (1999) Pre-exercise carbohydrate meals: application of glycemic index. Med Sci Sports Exerc 31, 164170.
27Thorne, M, Thompson, L & Jenkins, D (1983) Factors affecting starch digestibility and glycemic response with special reference to legumes. Am J Clin Nutr 38, 481488.
28Coyle, E, Hagberg, J, Hurley, B, et al. (1986) Muscle glycogen utilization during prolonged exercise when fed carbohydrates. J Appl Physiol 61, 165172.
29Bonen, A, Malcolm, S, Kilgour, R, et al. (1981) Glucose ingestion before and during intense exercise. J Appl Physiol 50, 766771.
30Bergman, B & Brooks, G (1999) Respiratory gas-exchange ratios during graded exercise in fed and fasted trained and untrained men. J Appl Physiol 86, 479487.
31Stevenson, E, Williams, C, Nute, M, et al. (2007) Influence of the glycaemic index of an evening meal on substrate oxidation following breakfast and during exercise the next day in healthy women. Eur J Clin Nutr 62, 608616.
32Wee, S, Williams, C, Tsintzas, K, et al. (2005) Ingestion of a high-glycemic index meal increases muscle glycogen storage at rest but augments its utilization during subsequent exercise. J Appl Physiol 99, 707714.
33Brooks, G (1986) The lactate shuttle during exercise and recovery. Med Sci Sports Exerc 18, 360368.
34Havel, R, Naimark, A & Borchgrevink, C (1963) Turnover rate and oxidation of free fatty acids of blood plasma in man during exercise: studies during continuous infusion of palmitate-1-c14. J Clin Invest 42, 16541663.
35Burke, L, Claassen, A, Hawley, J, et al. (1998) Carbohydrate intake during prolonged cycling minimizes effect of glycemic index of pre-exercise meal. J Appl Physiol 85, 22202226.
36Romijn, JA, Coyle, EF, Sidossis, LS, et al. (1995) Relationship between fatty acid delivery and fatty acid oxidation during strenuous exercise. J Appl Physiol 79, 19391945.
37Christmass, M, Dawson, B, Passeretto, P, et al. (1999) A comparison of skeletal muscle oxygenation and fuel use in sustained continuous and intermittent exercise. Eur J Appl Physiol 80, 423435.
38Jentjens, R & Jeukendrup, A (2003) Effects of pre-exercise ingestion of terehalose, galactose and glucose on subsequent metabolism and cycling performance. Eur J Appl Physiol 88, 459465.
39Mazza, G (2006) Compositional and functional properties of saskatoon berry and blueberry. Int J Fruit Sci 53, 101120.
40Henry, RR, Crapo, PA & Thorburn, AW (1991) Current issues in fructose metabolism. Ann Rev Nutr 11, 2139.
41Burke, LM, Collier, GR & Hargreaves, M (1993) Muscle glycogen storage after prolonged exercise: effect of the glycemic index of carbohydrate feedings. J Appl Physiol 75, 10191023.
42Stevenson, EJ, Thelwall, PE, Thomas, K, et al. (2009) Dietary glycemic index influences lipid oxidation but not muscle or liver glycogen oxidation during exercise. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 296, E1140E1147.
43Spencer, M, Rechichi, C, Lawrence, S, et al. (2005) Time–motion analysis of elite field hockey during several games in succession: a tournament scenario. J Sci Med Sport 8, 382391.
44Romijn, JA, Coyle, EF, Sidossis, LS, et al. (2000) Substrate metabolism during different exercise intensities in endurance-trained women. J Appl Physiol 88, 17071714.
45Horton, T, Miller, E, Glueck, D, et al. (2002) No effect of menstrual cycle phase on glucose kinetics and fuel oxidation during moderate-intensity exercise. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 282, E752E762.
46Rowlands, D (2002) Effects of high-fat and high-carbohydrate diets on metabolism and performance in cycling. Metabolism 51, 678690.
47Berardi, J, Price, T, Noreen, E, et al. (2006) Postexercise muscle glycogen recovery enhanced with a carbohydrate–protein supplement. Med Sci Sports Exerc 38, 11061113.
48Currell, K, Conway, S & Jeukendrup, AE (2009) Carbohydrate ingestion improves performance of a new reliable test of soccer performance. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 19, 3446.

Keywords

Metabolism and performance during extended high-intensity intermittent exercise after consumption of low- and high-glycaemic index pre-exercise meals

  • Christine B. Bennett (a1), Philip D. Chilibeck (a2), Trevor Barss (a2), Hassanali Vatanparast (a2), Albert Vandenberg (a3) and Gordon A. Zello (a1)...

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed