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Membrane fatty acid composition of rat skeletal muscle is most responsive to the balance of dietary n-3 and n-6 PUFA

  • Sarah K. Abbott (a1) (a2), Paul L. Else (a1) (a3) and A. J. Hulbert (a1) (a2)

Abstract

The present study quantifies the relationships between diet fatty acid profile and fatty acid composition of rat skeletal muscle phospholipids. Young adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were fed, for 8 weeks, on one of twelve moderate-fat diets (25 % of total energy) differing only in fatty acid profile. SFA content ranged from 8–88 % of total fatty acids, MUFA 6–65 %, total PUFA 4–81 %, n-6 PUFA 3–70 % and n-3 PUFA 1–70 %. Diet PUFA included only essential fatty acids 18 : 2n-6 and 18 : 3n-3. The balance between n-3 and n-6 PUFA (PUFA balance) in the diet ranged from 1 : 99 to 86 : 14 % n-3 PUFA:n-6 PUFA. The slope of muscle phospholipid composition plotted against diet composition quantifies the response of muscle membrane composition to dietary fat (0, no response; 1, complete conformity with diet). The resulting slopes were 0·02 (SFA), 0·10 (PUFA), 0·11 (MUFA), 0·14 (n-3 PUFA) and 0·23 (n-6 PUFA). The response to PUFA balance was biphasic with a slope of 0·98 below 10 % diet PUFA balance and 0·16 above 10 %. Thus, low diet PUFA balance has greater influence on muscle composition than 18-carbon n-3 or n-6 PUFA individually. Equations provided may allow prediction of muscle composition for other diet studies. Diet PUFA balance dramatically affects muscle 20 : 4n-6 and 22 : 6n-3. This may have significant implications for some disease states in human subjects.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Sarah K. Abbott, fax +61 2 4221 4135, email ska454@uow.edu.au

References

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Keywords

Membrane fatty acid composition of rat skeletal muscle is most responsive to the balance of dietary n-3 and n-6 PUFA

  • Sarah K. Abbott (a1) (a2), Paul L. Else (a1) (a3) and A. J. Hulbert (a1) (a2)

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