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Liver intracellular L-cysteine concentration is maintained after inhibition of the trans-sulfuration pathway by propargylglycine in rats

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Ana Triguero
Affiliation:
Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología MolecularUniversidad de Valencia, 46010-Valencia, Spain
Teresa Barber
Affiliation:
Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología MolecularUniversidad de Valencia, 46010-Valencia, Spain
Concha GarcÍa
Affiliation:
Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología MolecularUniversidad de Valencia, 46010-Valencia, Spain
Inmaculada R. Puertes
Affiliation:
Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología MolecularUniversidad de Valencia, 46010-Valencia, Spain
Juan Sastre
Affiliation:
Departamento de Fisiología, Facultades de Farmacia y Medicina, Universidad de Valencia, 46010-Valencia, Spain
Juan R. ViÑa
Affiliation:
Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología MolecularUniversidad de Valencia, 46010-Valencia, Spain
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Abstract

To study the fate of l-cysteine and amino acid homeostasis in liver after the inhibition of the trans-sulfuration pathway, rats were treated with propargylglycine (PPG). At 4 h after the administration of PPG, liver cystathionase (EC 4.4.1.1) activity was undetectable, l-cystathionine levels were significantly higher, l-cysteine was unchanged and GSH concentration was significantly lower than values found in livers from control rats injected intraperitoneally with 0.15 M-NaCl. The hepatic levels of amino acids that are intermediates of the urea cycle, l-ornithine, l-citrulline and l-arginine and blood urea were significantly greater. Urea excretion was also higher in PPG-treated rats when compared with control rats. These data suggest a stimulation of ureagenesis in PPG-treated rats. The inhibition of γ-cystathionase was reflected in the blood levels of amino acids, because the L-methionine: l-cyst(e)ine ratio was significantly higher in PPG-treated rats than in control rats; blood concentration of cystathionine was also greater. Histological examination of liver and kidney showed no changes in PPG-treated rats when compared with controls. The administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to PPG-treated rats reversed the changes in blood urea and in liver GSH. These data suggest that when liver l-cysteine production was impaired by the blockage of the trans-sulfuration pathway, the concentration of this amino acid was maintained mainly by an increase in protein degradation and by a depletion in GSH concentration that may spare l-cysteine.

Type
General Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1997

References

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Liver intracellular L-cysteine concentration is maintained after inhibition of the trans-sulfuration pathway by propargylglycine in rats
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