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Evaluation of body development, fat mass and lipid profile in rats fed with high-PUFA and -MUFA diets, after neonatal malnutrition

  • Carlos Alberto Soares da Costa (a1), Erika Gomes Alves (a1), Gabrielle de Paula Lopes Gonzalez (a1), Thais Barcellos Côrtes Barbosa (a1), Aluana Santana Carlos (a1), Verônica Demarco Lima (a1), Renata Nascimento (a1), Egberto Gaspar de Moura (a1) and Celly Cristina Alves do Nascimento-Saba (a1)...

Abstract

Neonatal malnutrition is associated with several features of the metabolic syndrome, later in life. Although the recovery of malnutrition was studied with different high-fat diets, few studies compare the effects of enriched vegetable oil diets, containing PUFA and MUFA, after weaning. Our aim was to evaluate the recovery with soya oil- or rapeseed oil-enriched diet, after malnutrition in rats whose mothers were food restricted (FR) during lactation. Dams were 50 % FR and compared to standard diet-fed dams (control, C). At 21 d, FR offspring had a lower body mass and length. After weaning C and FR offspring were fed a diet containing 7 % soya oil (7 %sC and 7 %sFR), or supplemented with 19 % soya oil (19 %sC or 19 %sFR) or 19 % rapeseed oil (19 %cC or 19 %cFR). The normal animals fed enriched vegetable oil diets had more visceral fat mass, but lower serum TAG and higher HDL-cholesterol. The 19 %FR groups showed significantly less food intake and body development compared to the 7 %sFR, and the same pattern was observed when this group was compared to the C groups. Absolute and relative mass of vital organs and body were lower in the FR groups. Visceral fat depot was lower in 19 %FR than 7 %FR and C groups. Serum glucose, albumin, TAG, cholesterol, leptin and triiodothyronine did not show significant changes. However, 19 %FR groups showed higher HDL-cholesterol and the 19 %sFR group showed lower serum thyroxine. The data suggest that a higher vegetable oil diet in the recovery of neonatal malnutrition ameliorates some features of the metabolic syndrome later in life.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr Celly C. Alves do Nascimento-Saba, fax +55 21 2587 6129, email celly@uerj.br

References

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Keywords

Evaluation of body development, fat mass and lipid profile in rats fed with high-PUFA and -MUFA diets, after neonatal malnutrition

  • Carlos Alberto Soares da Costa (a1), Erika Gomes Alves (a1), Gabrielle de Paula Lopes Gonzalez (a1), Thais Barcellos Côrtes Barbosa (a1), Aluana Santana Carlos (a1), Verônica Demarco Lima (a1), Renata Nascimento (a1), Egberto Gaspar de Moura (a1) and Celly Cristina Alves do Nascimento-Saba (a1)...

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