Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Efficiency of fat deposition from non-starch polysaccharides, starch and unsaturated fat in pigs

  • Veronika Halas (a1), László Babinszky (a1), Jan Dijkstra (a2), Martin W. A. Verstegen (a2) and Walter J. J. Gerrits (a2)...

Abstract

The aim was to evaluate under protein-limiting conditions the effect of different supplemental energy sources: fermentable NSP (fNSP), digestible starch (dStarch) and digestible unsaturated fat (dUFA), on marginal efficiency of fat deposition and distribution. A further aim was to determine whether the extra fat deposition from different energy sources, and its distribution in the body, depends on feeding level. A total of fifty-eight individually housed pigs (48 (sd 4) kg) were used in a 3 × 2 factorial design study, with three energy sources (0·2 MJ digestible energy (DE)/kg0·75 per d of fNSP, dStarch and dUFA added to a control diet) at two feeding levels. Ten pigs were slaughtered at 48 (sd 4) kg body weight and treatment pigs at 106 (sd 3) kg body weight. Bodies were dissected and the chemical composition of each body fraction was determined. The effect of energy sources on fat and protein deposition was expressed relative to the control treatments within both energy intake levels based on a total of thirty-two observations in six treatments, and these marginal differences were subsequently treated as dependent variables. Results showed that preferential deposition of the supplemental energy intake in various fat depots did not depend on the energy source, and the extra fat deposition was similar at each feeding level. The marginal energetic transformation (energy retention; ER) of fNSP, dStarch and dUFA for fat retention (ERfat:DE) was 44, 52 and 49 % (P>0·05), respectively. Feeding level affected fat distribution, but source of energy did not change the relative partitioning of fat deposition. The present results do not support values of energetic efficiencies currently used in net energy-based systems.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Efficiency of fat deposition from non-starch polysaccharides, starch and unsaturated fat in pigs
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Efficiency of fat deposition from non-starch polysaccharides, starch and unsaturated fat in pigs
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Efficiency of fat deposition from non-starch polysaccharides, starch and unsaturated fat in pigs
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr Veronika Halas, fax +36 82 313 562, email halas.veronika@ke.hu

References

Hide All
1 Halas, V, Dijkstra, J, Babinszky, L, et al. (2004) Modeling of nutrient partitioning in growing pigs to predict their anatomical body composition: 1. Model description. Br J Nut 92, 707723.
2 Halas, V, Dijkstra, J, Babinszky, L, et al. (2004) Modeling of nutrient partitioning in growing pigs to predict their anatomical body composition: 2. Model evaluation. Br J Nut 92, 725734.
3 Agricultural Research Council (1981) The Nutrient Requirements of Pigs. Slough, UK: Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux.
4 Black, JL (1995) The evolution of animal growth models. Modelling Growth in the Pig, EAAP Publication no. 78, pp. 39 [Moughan, PJ, Verstegen, MWA and Visser-Reyneveld, MI, editors]. Wageningen, The Netherlands: Wageningen Pers.
5 Mersmann, HJ, Pond, WG & Yen, JT (1984) Use of carbohydrate and fat as energy source by obese and lean swine. J Anim Sci 54, 894902.
6 Bakker, GCM (1996) Interaction between carbohydrates and fat in pigs; impact on energy evaluation of feeds. PhD Thesis, Agricultural University, Wageningen, The Netherlands..
7 de la Llata, M, Dritz, SS, Tokach, MD, et al. (2001) Effects of dietary fat on growth performance and carcass caracteristics of growing and finishing pigs reared in a commercial environments. J Anim Sci 79, 26432650.
8 Rijnen, M (2003) Energetic utilization of dietary fiber in pigs. PhD Thesis, Agricultural University, Wageningen, The Netherlands..
9 Halas, V & Babinszky, L (2001) Effect of energy and lysine intake on the performance of fattening pigs and on the efficiency of protein and fat deposition (article in Hungarian with an abstract in English). Anim Breed Nutr Hung 50, 243256.
10 Kovach, G (2002) KA-HYB swine breeding and its connection with progeny testing (article in Hungarian with an abstract in English). Acta Agraria Kaposvariensis 6, 1723.
11 National Research Council (1998) Nutrient Requirements of Swine. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
12 Central Veevoederbureau (1998) Table of Feedstuffs. Lelystad, The Netherlands: Central Veevoederbureau.
13 Kotarbinska, M (1971) The chemical composition of the body in growing pigs. Roczniki Nauk Rolniczych B-93-1, 129135.
14 Association of Official Analytical Chemists (2000) Official Methods for Analysis, 17th ed. Gaithersburg, MD: AOAC.
15 Association of Official Analytical Chemists (1990) Official Methods of Analysis, 15th ed. Arlington, VA: AOAC.
16 Morris, TR (1999) How many animals? In Experimental Design and Analysis in Animal Science, pp. 3141 [Morris, TR, editor]. Wallingford, UK: CABI Publishing.
17 Bikker, P, Verstegen, MWA & Campbell, RG (1996) Performance and body composition of fattening gilts (45–85 kg) as affected by energy intake and nutrition in early life. 2. Protein and lipid accretion in body components. J Anim Sci 74, 817826.
18 SAS Institute, Inc. (1990) SAS User's Guide. Cary, NC: SAS Institute, Inc.
19 Jorgensen, JN, Fernandez, JA, Jørgensen, HH, et al. (1985) Anatomical and chemical composition of female pigs and barrows of Danish Landrace related to nutrition. Z Tierphysiol Tieternähr Futtermittelkde 54, 253263.
20 Noblet, J, Karege, C & Dubois, S (1989) Influence of sex and genotype on energy utilization in growing pigs. In Energy Metabolism of Farm Animals, Proceedings of the Eleventh Symposium, Lunteren, The Netherlands, 18–24 September 1988, EAAP publication no. 43, pp. 5760 [van der Honing, Y and Close, WH, editors]. Wageningen, The Netherlands: Pudoc.
21 van Lunen, TA & Cole, DJA (1996) The effect of lysine/digestible energy ratio on growth performance and nitrogen deposition of hybrid boars, gilts and castrated male pigs. Anim Sci 63, 465475.
22 Bikker, P, Verstegen, MWA, Campbell, RG, et al. (1994) Digestible lysine requirement of gilts with high genetic potential for lean gain, in relation to the level of energy intake. J Anim Sci 72, 17441753.
23 Bakker, GCM, Dekker, RA & Verstegen, MWA, et al. (1996) Energy gain in pigs recieving diets containing large amounts of fat and fermentable carbohydrates. In Interaction between carbohydrates and fat in pigs; impact on energy evaluation of feeds, pp. 139–161. PhD Thesis, Agricultural University, Wageningen, The Netherlands..
24 Bach-Knudsen, KE (2001) The nutritional significance of ‘dietary fibre’ analysis. Anim Feed Sci Technol 90, 320.
25 Bolhuis, JE, van den Brand, H, Staals, STM, et al. (2008) Effects of fermentable starch and straw-enriched housing on energy partitioning of growing pigs. Animal 2, 10281036.
26 de Lange, CFM (1995) Framework for a simplified model to demonstrate principles of nutrient partitioning for growth in the pig. In Modelling Growth in the Pig, pp. 7186 [Moughan, PJ, Verstegen, MWA and Visser-Reyneveld, MI, editors]. Wageningen, The Netherlands: Wageningen Pers.
27 Emmans, GC & Kyriazakis, I (1995) A general method for predicting the weight of water in the empty bodies of pigs. Anim Sci 61, 103108.
28 Schiemann, R, Nehring, K, Hoffmann, L, et al. (1972) Energetische Futterbevertung und Energienormen (Energetic Assessment of Feeds). Berlin: VEB Deutscher Landwirtschatsverlag.
29 Noblet, J, Fortune, H, Shi, XS, et al. (1994) Prediction of net energy value of feeds for growing pigs. J Anim Sci 72, 344354.
30 Noblet, J, Karege, C, Dubois, S, et al. (1999) Metabolic utilization of energy and maintenance requirements in growing pigs: effect of sex and genotype. J Anim Sci 77, 12081216.
31 Schrama, JW, Bosch, MW, Verstegen, MWA, et al. (1998) The energetic value of non-starch polysaccharides in relation to physical activity in group-housed, growing pigs. J Anim Sci 76, 30163023.
32 Rijnen, M, Verstegen, MWA, Heetkamp, MJW, et al. (2003) Effects of dietary fermentable carbohydrates on behavior and heat production in group-housed sows. J Anim Sci 81, 182190.
33 Van Heugten, E, Van den Borne, JJCG, Verstegen, MWA, et al. (2007) Measurement of fatty acid oxidation in swine using 13C labeled fatty acids. In Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Energy and Protein Metabolism and Nutrition EAAP publication no. 124, pp. 235236 [Ortigues-Marty, I, Miraux, N and Brand-Williams, W, editors]. Wageningen, The Netherlands: Wageningen Academic Publishers.
34 de Greef, K & Verstegen, MWA (1992) Partitioning of protein and lipid deposition in the body of growing pigs. Livest Prod Sci 35, 317328.
35 Scipioni, R, Sardi, L, Barchi, D, et al. (1991) Elevate quantita di insilati nell'alimentazione del suino pesante: effeti sulle performance di accresimento e di macellazione (High amount of silage in the heavy pigs: effects on performance and slaughter accretion). Riv Suinicolt 32, 7178.
36 Knowles, TA, Southern, LL, Bidner, TD, et al. (1998) Effect of dietary fiber or fat in low-crude protein, crystalline amino acid-supplemented diets for finishing pigs. J Anim Sci 76, 28182832.
37 Pekas, JC, Yen, JT & Pond, WG (1983) Gastrointestinal, carcass and performance trials of obese versus lean genotype swine: effect of dietary fiber. Nutr Rep Int 27, 259270.
38 Pond, WG, Varel, VH, Dickinson, JS, et al. (1989) Comparative response of swine and rats to high fiber or high protein diets. J Anim Sci 67, 716723.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed