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Effects of peroxidation products in thermoxidised dietary oil in female rats during rearing, pregnancy and lactation on their reproductive performance and the antioxidative status of their offspring

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Corinna Brandsch
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenber, Emil-Abderhalden-Straße 26, D-06108 Halle/Saale, Germany
Klaus Eder
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenber, Emil-Abderhalden-Straße 26, D-06108 Halle/Saale, Germany
Corresponding
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Abstract

The present study was performed to investigate whether lipid peroxidation products in thermoxidised dietary oil fed during rearing, pregnancy and lactation influences the reproductive performance of female rats and the antioxidant status of their offspring. Twenty-four female rats were divided into two groups at 4 weeks of age. They were fed diets containing fresh or oxidised oil (the latter prepared by heating at a temperature of 50°C for 16 d) for 14 weeks. At the age of 12 weeks female rats were mated. The number of total pups and pups born alive was not different between both groups. However, individual pups and litters of dams fed oxidised oil were lighter at birth and gained less weight during the suckling period than those of dams fed fresh oil (P>0·05). Pups of dams fed oxidised oil contained less protein and more fat in their carcasses than those of dams fed fresh oil (P>0·05). The milk of dams fed oxidised oil had a lower concentration of triacylglycerols and a lower energy content than that of dams fed the fresh oil (P>0·05). The pups of dams fed oxidised oil had higher concentrations of lipid peroxidation products in the liver at birth and day 19 of lactation than those of dams fed fresh oil (P>0·05). In conclusion, the present study shows that feeding oxidised oil with a high concentration of lipid peroxidation products to female rats during rearing, pregnancy and lactation influences the development and antioxidant status of fetus and suckling pups.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2004

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Effects of peroxidation products in thermoxidised dietary oil in female rats during rearing, pregnancy and lactation on their reproductive performance and the antioxidative status of their offspring
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