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Differing effects of high-fat or high-carbohydrate meals on food hedonics in overweight and obese individuals

  • Mark Hopkins (a1) (a2), Catherine Gibbons (a2), Phillipa Caudwell (a2) (a3), John E. Blundell (a2) and Graham Finlayson (a2)...

Abstract

Although the effects of dietary fat and carbohydrate on satiety are well documented, little is known about the impact of these macronutrients on food hedonics. We examined the effects of ad libitum and isoenergetic meals varying in fat and carbohydrate on satiety, energy intake and food hedonics. In all, sixty-five overweight and obese individuals (BMI=30·9 (sd 3·8) kg/m2) completed two separate test meal days in a randomised order in which they consumed high-fat/low-carbohydrate (HFLC) or low-fat/high-carbohydrate (LFHC) foods. Satiety was measured using subjective appetite ratings to calculate the satiety quotient. Satiation was assessed by intake at ad libitum meals. Hedonic measures of explicit liking (subjective ratings) and implicit wanting (speed of forced choice) for an array of HFLC and LFHC foods were also tested before and after isoenergetic HFLC and LFHC meals. The satiety quotient was greater after ad libitum and isoenergetic meals during the LFHC condition compared with the HFLC condition (P=0·006 and P=0·001, respectively), whereas ad libitum energy intake was lower in the LFHC condition (P<0·001). Importantly, the LFHC meal also reduced explicit liking (P<0·001) and implicit wanting (P=0·011) for HFLC foods compared with the isoenergetic HFLC meal, which failed to suppress the hedonic appeal of subsequent HFLC foods. Therefore, when coupled with increased satiety and lower energy intake, the greater suppression of hedonic appeal for high-fat food seen with LFHC foods provides a further mechanism for why these foods promote better short-term appetite control than HFLC foods.

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Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Dr M. Hopkins, email M.Hopkins@shu.ac.uk

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Differing effects of high-fat or high-carbohydrate meals on food hedonics in overweight and obese individuals

  • Mark Hopkins (a1) (a2), Catherine Gibbons (a2), Phillipa Caudwell (a2) (a3), John E. Blundell (a2) and Graham Finlayson (a2)...

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