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Dietary intake, glucose metabolism and sex hormones in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared with women with non-PCOS-related infertility

  • Ya-Hui Tsai (a1), Ting-Wen Wang (a1), Hsiao-Jui Wei (a2), Chien-Yeh Hsu (a3), Hsin-Jung Ho (a1), Wen-Hua Chen (a3), Robert Young (a2), Chian-Mey Liaw (a2) and Jane C.-J. Chao (a1) (a4)...
  • Please note a correction has been issued for this article.

Abstract

The present study investigated dietary intake, glucose metabolism and sex hormones in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A total of forty-five women (aged 25–40 years) with PCOS and 161 control women (aged 25–43 years) with non-PCOS-related infertility were recruited. Anthropometry, glucose tolerance and sex hormones were determined and dietary intake was assessed. Women with PCOS had lower serum sex hormone-binding globulin and increased BMI, waist:hip ratio, luteinising hormone, ratio of luteinising hormone:follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone and free androgen index (FAI). Postprandial glucose, fasting insulin and insulin resistance were elevated in women with PCOS. Women with PCOS had reduced energy and carbohydrate intake but higher fat intake. Serum sex hormone-binding globulin level was negatively associated with BMI in both groups and negatively correlated with macronutrient intake in the PCOS group with hyperandrogenism. However, FAI was positively correlated with BMI, waist circumference and glucose metabolic parameters in both groups. Therefore, women with PCOS consume lower energy and carbohydrate compared with those with non-PCOS-related infertility and macronutrient intake is only negatively associated with serum sex hormone-binding globulin level in the PCOS group with hyperandrogenism.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding authors: Dr Jane C.-J. Chao, fax +886 2 2737 3112, email chenjui@tmu.edu.tw; Dr Hsiao-Jui Wei, email wei0937059468@yahoo.com.tw

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