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Derivation of anthropometric cut-off levels to define CVD risk in Sri Lankan adults

  • P. Katulanda (a1) (a2), M. A. R. Jayawardena (a1), M. H. R. Sheriff (a1) and D. R. Matthews (a2)

Abstract

Obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Anthropometric cut-off values derived for Caucasians may not be applicable to other populations. The main objective of the present study was to derive population-specific anthropometric cut-off values to define high CVD risk for Sri Lankan adults. A nationally representative sample of 4474 non-institutionalised adults aged ≥ 18 years was analysed. Cut-off values to provide optimum sensitivity and specificity were derived using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis. BMI, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), blood pressure and overnight fasting venous blood samples were collected to measure glucose, HDL-cholesterol and TAG. An oral glucose tolerance test was also performed. The results suggested that the age-adjusted BMI, WC and WHR were significantly associated with all cardiovascular risk factors (P < 0·001). Cut-off values for BMI, WC and WHR for males were 20·7 kg/m2, 76·5 cm and 0·89, respectively. The respective values for females were 22·0 kg/m2, 76·3 cm and 0·85. The common cut-off value for BMI for males and females was 21·5 kg/m2. Similarly, WC and WHR cut-off values for both males and females were 76·3 cm and 0·87, respectively. The Asian and Caucasian anthropometric cut-off levels showed lower sensitivity and higher false negative percentage compared with newly derived cut-off levels. In conclusion, BMI, WC and WHR were all associated with increased CVD risk. We propose the following anthropometric cut-off points to determine high CVD risk level for Sri Lankan adults: BMI ≥ 21·5 kg/m2, WC ≥ 76 cm and WHR ≥ 0·85 (women) and 0·90 (men).

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr P. Katulanda, email pkatulanda@yahoo.com

References

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Derivation of anthropometric cut-off levels to define CVD risk in Sri Lankan adults

  • P. Katulanda (a1) (a2), M. A. R. Jayawardena (a1), M. H. R. Sheriff (a1) and D. R. Matthews (a2)

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